Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

, Volume 18, Issue 5, pp 705–714

The influence of surface chemistry and topography on the contact guidance of MG63 osteoblast cells

Authors

    • Biomedical Engineering, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic EngineeringUniversity of Sydney
  • R. Rohanizadeh
    • Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Sydney
  • S. Atwa
    • Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Sydney
  • R. S. Mason
    • Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Sydney
  • A. J. Ruys
    • Biomedical Engineering, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic EngineeringUniversity of Sydney
  • P. J. Martin
    • CSIRO, Industrial Physics
  • A. Bendavid
    • CSIRO, Industrial Physics
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10856-006-0012-2

Cite this article as:
Ismail, F.S.M., Rohanizadeh, R., Atwa, S. et al. J Mater Sci: Mater Med (2007) 18: 705. doi:10.1007/s10856-006-0012-2

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to determine in vitro the effects of different surface topographies and chemistries of commercially pure titanium (cpTi) and diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces on osteoblast growth and attachment. Microgrooves (widths of 2, 4, 8 and 10 μm and a depth of 1.5–2 μm) were patterned onto silicon (Si) substrates using microlithography and reactive ion etching. The Si substrates were subsequently vapor coated with either cpTi or DLC coatings. All surfaces were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. Using the MG63 Osteoblast-Like cell line, we determined cell viability, adhesion, and morphology on different substrates over a 3 day culture period. The results showed cpTi surfaces to be significantly more hydrophilic than DLC for groove sizes larger than 2 μm. Cell contact guidance was observed for all grooved samples in comparison to the unpatterned controls. The cell viability tests indicated a significantly greater cell number for 8 and 10 μm grooves on cpTi surfaces compared to other groove sizes. The cell adhesion study showed that the smaller groove sizes, as well as the unpatterned control groups, displayed better cell adhesion to the substrate.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007