Thermodynamic study of functionalized calix[n]arene and resorcinol[n]arene monolayers spreaded at an aqueous pendant drop

  • Paula V. Messina
  • Olga Pieroni
  • Bruno Vuano
  • Juan Manuel Ruso
  • Gerardo Prieto
  • Félix Sarmiento
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10847-009-9715-6

Cite this article as:
Messina, P.V., Pieroni, O., Vuano, B. et al. J Incl Phenom Macrocycl Chem (2010) 67: 343. doi:10.1007/s10847-009-9715-6

Abstract

The behavior of insoluble calix[n]arene and resorcinol[n]arene derivatives monolayers were studied through the use of a constant surface Langmuir balance based on Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA). In each case, a stable monolayer was obtained and different transitions (induced for lateral compression) could be identified. Thermodynamic parameters were computed through two dimensional Clausius–Clayperon equations and used to valuate the monolayer stability. A noticeable reduction of thermodynamic parameters occurred at highly tested temperatures (328 and 338 K) for those compounds that had hydrocarbon tails or benzene rings attached to one side of macrocyclic rim. Such fact was related to a monolayer rearrangement where the macrocyclic ring changed from a parallel to a perpendicular orientation. In this orientation the hydrophobic interactions between hydrocarbon chains and benzene rings were maximized. At highly temperature, where vigorous molecular motion existed, those interactions were superior to the stabilization effect through hydrogen bond.

Keywords

Langmuir monolayers Calix[n]arenes Resorcinol[n]arenes ADSA Conformational changes Thermodynamic 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paula V. Messina
    • 1
    • 2
  • Olga Pieroni
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bruno Vuano
    • 3
  • Juan Manuel Ruso
    • 4
  • Gerardo Prieto
    • 5
  • Félix Sarmiento
    • 5
  1. 1.Departamento de QuímicaUniversidad Nacional del SurBahia BlancaArgentina
  2. 2.INQUISUR-CONICETUniversidad Nacional del SurBahia BlancaArgentina
  3. 3.Facultad Regional Bahía BlancaUniversidad TecnológicaBahia BlancaArgentina
  4. 4.Soft Matter and Molecular Biophysics Group, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultade de FísicaUniversidad de Santiago de CompostelaSantiago de CompostelaSpain
  5. 5.Biophysics and Interfaces Group, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultade de FísicaUniversidad de Santiago de CompostelaSantiago de CompostelaSpain

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