Journal of Insect Conservation

, 13:553

Habitat preferences of oak-feeding xylophagous beetles in a temperate woodland: implications for forest history and management

Authors

  • Stepan Vodka
    • Department of Zoology, Faculty of SciencesUniversity of South Bohemia
    • Department of Ecology and Conservation, Institute of EntomologyCzech Academy of Sciences
  • Martin Konvicka
    • Department of Zoology, Faculty of SciencesUniversity of South Bohemia
    • Department of Ecology and Conservation, Institute of EntomologyCzech Academy of Sciences
    • Department of Zoology, Faculty of SciencesUniversity of South Bohemia
    • Department of Ecology and Conservation, Institute of EntomologyCzech Academy of Sciences
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10841-008-9202-1

Cite this article as:
Vodka, S., Konvicka, M. & Cizek, L. J Insect Conserv (2009) 13: 553. doi:10.1007/s10841-008-9202-1

Abstract

Oaks host the richest fauna of saproxylic insect in Europe. We studied habitat preferences of two beetle families, Buprestidae and Cerambycidae, by rearing the beetles from standardised oak timber baits. Species density was higher in the understorey than in the canopy; and in sun-exposed baits if within the understorey. Insolation was the most important factor affecting the composition of reared assemblages (explaining ca. 30% of variation in the data), followed by vertical stratum (ca. 10%). Local dead wood volume had no effect. The high preference for sun-exposed wood located near the ground suggests that: (i) open-canopy woodlands had to be rather common in temperate Europe; (ii) oak-utilising xylophages would benefit from restoration of management practices such as coppicing or woodland pasture; (iii) the policy of increasing dead wood volume in commercial forests is principally correct, but its success will depend on dead wood location within the forests.

Keywords

Biodiversity conservationForest managementOakSaproxylicXylophages

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008