Journal of Family and Economic Issues

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 3–13

Men’s Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood

  • Nan Marie Astone
  • Jacinda K. Dariotis
  • Freya L. Sonenstein
  • Joseph H. Pleck
  • Kathryn Hynes
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10834-009-9174-7

Cite this article as:
Astone, N.M., Dariotis, J.K., Sonenstein, F.L. et al. J Fam Econ Iss (2010) 31: 3. doi:10.1007/s10834-009-9174-7

Abstract

In this paper we tested three hypotheses: (a) the transition to fatherhood is associated with an increase in work effort; (b) the positive association (if any) between the transition to fatherhood and work effort is greater for fathers who are married at the time of the transition; and (c) the association (if any) is greater for men who make the transition at younger ages. The data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort. The transition to fatherhood was associated with an increase in work effort among young unmarried men, but not for married men. Among married men who were on-time fathers, work effort decreased. Among childless men, the marriage transition was associated with increased work effort.

Keywords

FathersMarriageWork

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nan Marie Astone
    • 1
  • Jacinda K. Dariotis
    • 1
  • Freya L. Sonenstein
    • 1
  • Joseph H. Pleck
    • 2
  • Kathryn Hynes
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Population, Family and Reproductive HealthThe Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Human and Community DevelopmentUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Human Development and Family StudiesPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA