Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 24, Issue 5, pp 1285–1294

Psychometric Properties of the Child’s Reaction to Traumatic Events Scale-Revised in English and Lugandan

  • Lucy E. Napper
  • Dennis G. Fisher
  • Adi Jaffe
  • Russell T. Jones
  • Vivian S. Lamphear
  • Lisa Joseph
  • Elizabeth M. Grimaldi
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10826-014-9936-1

Cite this article as:
Napper, L.E., Fisher, D.G., Jaffe, A. et al. J Child Fam Stud (2015) 24: 1285. doi:10.1007/s10826-014-9936-1
  • 187 Views

Abstract

Brief and age-appropriate measures of trauma-related symptoms are useful for identifying children in need of clinical services. The current study examines the psychometric properties of the 23-item Child’s Reaction to Traumatic Events Scale-Revised (CRTES-R). The CRTES-R includes subscales assessing hyperarousal, avoidance and intrusion. To date, no studies have examined the psychometric properties of this revised measure or cross-cultural differences in its factor structure. Two samples of (a) children (ages 6–21) who had experienced a hurricane in the USA or Grenada (N = 135), and (b) Ugandan children (ages 8–17) who had experienced a variety of traumatic events (N = 339) completed the CRTES-R in English or Lugandan. Confirmatory factor analysis supported an empirically adjusted model with three modified latent factors in both the English (χ2/df = 1.34, CFI = .90, RMSEA = .05) and Lugandan samples (χ2/df = 1.45, CFI = .93, RMSEA = .04). Although the analysis supported separate hyperarousal, avoidance and intrusion subscales, the items that loaded on each factor differed from the original CRTES-R subscales. The English version of the CRTES-R showed good concurrent validity with the Kauai Recovery Index measure of trauma symptoms. Those using the CRTES-R to assess children’s experiences of the different symptom types should consider using the empirically-derived subscales described in this paper; however, those who wish to capture a broad spectrum of PTSD symptoms should consider using all the original CRTES-R items and calculating a total score.

Keywords

Traumatic stressChildrenPsychometricsCRTES-RCross-cultural

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucy E. Napper
    • 1
  • Dennis G. Fisher
    • 2
  • Adi Jaffe
    • 2
  • Russell T. Jones
    • 3
  • Vivian S. Lamphear
    • 4
  • Lisa Joseph
    • 5
  • Elizabeth M. Grimaldi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLoyola Marymount UniversityLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Center for Behavioral Research and ServicesCalifornia State UniversityLong BeachUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyVirginia Tech UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  4. 4.Save Africa’s ChildrenLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychologySun Yat-Sen UniversityGuangzhouChina