Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

, 28:725

Digital holographic microscopy in human sperm imaging

Authors

    • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of MedicineMasaryk University, and Faculty Hospital
  • Jana Zakova
    • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of MedicineMasaryk University, and Faculty Hospital
  • Martin Huser
    • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of MedicineMasaryk University, and Faculty Hospital
  • Pavel Ventruba
    • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of MedicineMasaryk University, and Faculty Hospital
  • Eva Lousova
    • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of MedicineMasaryk University, and Faculty Hospital
  • Michal Pohanka
    • Department of Functional Diagnostics and RehabilitationSt. Anne’s Faculty Hospital
Technical Innovations

DOI: 10.1007/s10815-011-9584-y

Cite this article as:
Crha, I., Zakova, J., Huser, M. et al. J Assist Reprod Genet (2011) 28: 725. doi:10.1007/s10815-011-9584-y

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to use digital holographic microscopy (DHM) in human sperm imaging and compare quantitative phase contrast of sperm heads in normozoospermia (NZ) and oligoasthenozoospermia (OAT).

Methods

DHM spermatozoa imaging and repeated quantitative phase shift evaluation were used. Five NZ and 5 OAT samples were examined. Semen samples were examined by semen analysis and processed for DHM. Main outcome measures were maximum phase shift value of the sperm heads. Differences of the phase shift and in NZ and OAT samples were statistically tested.

Results

In NZ samples median phase shifts were in the range 2.72–3.21 rad and 2.00–2.15 in OAT samples. Differences among individual samples were statistically significant (p < 0.001) in both groups. Median phase shift according to sperm count was 2.90 rad in NZ samples and 2.00 rad in OAT samples. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001).

Conclusion

Quantitative evaluation of the phase shift by DHM could provide new information on the exact structure and composition of the sperm head. At present, this technique is not established for clinical utility.

Keywords

Digital holographic microscopySperm imagingSpermatozoonMale infertilityChromatin integrity

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011