, Volume 27, Issue 9-10, pp 539-544
Date: 16 Jul 2010

Overweight Men: clinical pregnancy after ART is decreased in IVF but not in ICSI cycles

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Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate if elevated male body mass influences success after assisted reproductive technologies

Methods

Retrospective study of 290 cycles.

Results

Male body mass index greater than 25.0 kg/m2 was associated with significantly lower clinical pregnancy (53.2% vs. 33.6%). Multivariable logistic regression indicated that the likelihood of clinical pregnancy was decreased if the male partner was overweight after in vitro fertilization but not after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (odds ratios: 0.21 [0.07–0.69] vs. 0.75 [0.38–1.49], respectively) after adjustment for number of embryos transferred, sperm concentration, female age and body mass.

Conclusion

In this cohort, overweight status of the male partner was independently associated with decreased likelihood of clinical pregnancy after in vitro fertilization but not after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. A detrimental impact of higher male body mass was observed after adjusting for sperm concentration, suggesting that intracytoplasmic sperm injection may overcome some obesity related impairment of sperm-egg interaction.

The authors declare that they have no potential conflicts of interest

Capsule

Overweight status of the male partner is associated with decreased likelihood of clinical pregnancy after IVF but not after ICSI cycles.