Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 44, Issue 5, pp 1128–1143

Measuring Anxiety as a Treatment Endpoint in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Luc Lecavalier
  • Jeffrey J. Wood
  • Alycia K. Halladay
  • Nancy E. Jones
  • Michael G. Aman
  • Edwin H. Cook
  • Benjamin L. Handen
  • Bryan H. King
  • Deborah A. Pearson
  • Victoria Hallett
  • Katherine Anne Sullivan
  • Sabrina Grondhuis
  • Somer L. Bishop
  • Joseph P. Horrigan
  • Geraldine Dawson
  • Lawrence Scahill
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-013-1974-9

Cite this article as:
Lecavalier, L., Wood, J.J., Halladay, A.K. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2014) 44: 1128. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1974-9

Abstract

Despite the high rate of anxiety in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), measuring anxiety in ASD is fraught with uncertainty. This is due, in part, to incomplete consensus on the manifestations of anxiety in this population. Autism Speaks assembled a panel of experts to conduct a systematic review of available measures for anxiety in youth with ASD. To complete the review, the panel held monthly conference calls and two face-to-face meetings over a fourteen-month period. Thirty eight published studies were reviewed and ten assessment measures were examined: four were deemed appropriate for use in clinical trials, although with conditions; three were judged to be potentially appropriate, while three were considered not useful for clinical trials assessing anxiety. Despite recent advances, additional relevant, reliable and valid outcome measures are needed to evaluate treatments for anxiety in ASD.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Anxiety Instrument Measure Assessment Treatment Intervention 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luc Lecavalier
    • 1
  • Jeffrey J. Wood
    • 2
  • Alycia K. Halladay
    • 3
  • Nancy E. Jones
    • 3
    • 11
  • Michael G. Aman
    • 1
  • Edwin H. Cook
    • 4
  • Benjamin L. Handen
    • 5
  • Bryan H. King
    • 6
  • Deborah A. Pearson
    • 7
  • Victoria Hallett
    • 8
  • Katherine Anne Sullivan
    • 9
  • Sabrina Grondhuis
    • 1
  • Somer L. Bishop
    • 10
  • Joseph P. Horrigan
    • 3
    • 11
  • Geraldine Dawson
    • 3
    • 12
  • Lawrence Scahill
    • 13
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Nisonger CenterOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Education and Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Autism SpeaksNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Institute for Juvenile Research, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  5. 5.University of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA
  6. 6.Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Washington and Seattle Children’s HospitalSeattleUSA
  7. 7.Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Texas Medical SchoolHoustonUSA
  8. 8.Kings College LondonLondonUK
  9. 9.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  10. 10.Department of Psychology and PsychiatryWeill Cornell Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  11. 11.Neuren Pharmaceuticals LimitedDurhamUSA
  12. 12.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  13. 13.Department of Pediatrics, Marcus CenterEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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