Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 481–494

Cardiac Reactivity and Stimulant Use in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders with Comorbid ADHD Versus ADHD

  • M. Bink
  • A. Popma
  • I. L. Bongers
  • G. J. M. van Boxtel
  • A. Denissen
  • Ch. van Nieuwenhuizen
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-013-1929-1

Cite this article as:
Bink, M., Popma, A., Bongers, I.L. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2015) 45: 481. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1929-1

Abstract

A large number of youngsters with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) display comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. However, previous studies are not conclusive whether psychophysiological correlates, like cardiac reactivity, are different for ASD with comorbid ADHD (ASD+) compared to ADHD. Therefore, the current study investigated (dis)similarities in cardiac reactivity and attention task performance. In a clinical sample, adolescents diagnosed with ASD+ (n = 20) versus ADHD (n = 36) and stimulant medication use (56 %) were compared during a baseline with eyes closed and task performance. Results for cardiac reactivity were similar for both diagnostic groups. Stimulant-medicated adolescents showed decreased adaptation of LF/HF ratio and faster reaction times than stimulant-free adolescents. The current study underlines the psychophysiological overlap of ADHD symptoms in adolescents with ASD+ and adolescents with ADHD.

Keywords

Cardiac adaptationHRVASDADHDStimulant medication

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Bink
    • 1
  • A. Popma
    • 2
  • I. L. Bongers
    • 3
  • G. J. M. van Boxtel
    • 4
  • A. Denissen
    • 5
  • Ch. van Nieuwenhuizen
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Tranzo, Faculty of Social and Behavioural SciencesTilburg UniversityTilburgThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Academic Department of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryVUmc/De BasculeDuivendrechtThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Centre for Child and Adolescent PsychiatryGGzEEindhovenThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Behavioural SciencesTilburg UniversityTilburgThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Philips Research, Brain, Body, and Behavior GroupEindhovenThe Netherlands