Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 43, Issue 11, pp 2515–2525

Comparison of ICD-10R, DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 in an Adult Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Clinic

Authors

    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Nicola Gillan
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Deborah Spain
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dene Robertson
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Gedeon Roberts
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Clodagh M. Murphy
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Stefanos Maltezos
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Janneke Zinkstok
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Katie Johnston
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Christina Dardani
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
  • Chris Ohlsen
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • P. Quinton Deeley
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Michael Craig
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Maria A. Mendez
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
  • Francesca Happé
    • Department of Social Genetic Developmental and Psychiatry Centre, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
  • Declan G. M. Murphy
    • Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College
    • Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-013-1799-6

Cite this article as:
Wilson, C.E., Gillan, N., Spain, D. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2013) 43: 2515. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1799-6

Abstract

An Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis is often used to access services. We investigated whether ASD diagnostic outcome varied when DSM-5 was used compared to ICD-10R and DSM-IV-TR in a clinical sample of 150 intellectually able adults. Of those diagnosed with an ASD using ICD-10R, 56 % met DSM-5 ASD criteria. A further 19 % met DSM-5 (draft) criteria for Social Communication Disorder. Of those diagnosed with Autistic Disorder/Asperger Syndrome on DSM-IV-TR, 78 % met DSM-5 ASD criteria. Sensitivity of DSM-5 was significantly increased by reducing the number of criteria required for a DSM-5 diagnosis, or by rating ‘uncertain’ criteria as ‘present’, without sacrificing specificity. Reduced rates of ASD diagnosis may mean some ASD individuals will be unable to access clinical services.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum DisorderDiagnosisPrevalenceDSM-5

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013