Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 42, Issue 11, pp 2323–2334

Parental Occupational Exposures and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Authors

    • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, MS: L4050
  • Desta Fekedulegn
    • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, MS: L4050
  • Anna Mnatsakanova
    • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, MS: L4050
  • Cecil M. Burchfiel
    • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, MS: L4050
  • Wayne T. Sanderson
    • College of Public Health, The University of Kentucky
  • Luenda E. Charles
    • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, MS: L4050
  • Irva Hertz-Picciotto
    • University of California, Davis
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-012-1468-1

Cite this article as:
McCanlies, E.C., Fekedulegn, D., Mnatsakanova, A. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2012) 42: 2323. doi:10.1007/s10803-012-1468-1

Abstract

Both self-report and industrial hygienist (IH) assessed parental occupational information were used in this pilot study in which 174 families (93 children with ASD and 81 unaffected children) enrolled in the Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment study participated. IH results indicated exposures to lacquer, varnish, and xylene occurred more often in the parents of children with ASD compared to the parents of unaffected children. Parents of children with ASD were more likely to report exposures to asphalt and solvents compared to parents of unaffected children. This study was limited by the small sample size, but results suggest that workplace exposures to some chemicals may be important in the etiology of ASD and deserve further investigation.

Keywords

AutismAutism spectrum disorderParental exposuresParentOccupationExposure

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (outside the USA) 2012