Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 23–34

Examination of the Properties of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) in a Population Sample

Authors

  • Brie Yama
    • Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsThe University of Western Ontario
    • Division of Children’s Health and TherapeuticsChildren’s Health Research Institute
    • Chicago Medical SchoolRosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science
  • Tom Freeman
    • Department of Family MedicineThe University of Western Ontario
  • Erin Graves
    • Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsThe University of Western Ontario
    • Division of Children’s Health and TherapeuticsChildren’s Health Research Institute
  • Su Yuan
    • Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsThe University of Western Ontario
    • Division of Children’s Health and TherapeuticsChildren’s Health Research Institute
    • Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Calgary
    • Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsThe University of Western Ontario
    • Division of Children’s Health and TherapeuticsChildren’s Health Research Institute
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynaecologyThe University of Western Ontario
    • Department of PaediatricsThe University of Western Ontario
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-011-1211-3

Cite this article as:
Yama, B., Freeman, T., Graves, E. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2012) 42: 23. doi:10.1007/s10803-011-1211-3

Abstract

This study examines the following properties of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) in an unselected low-risk sample: (a) the maximum age for screen administration; (b) the positive screen rate in the absence of follow-up telephone interviews and; (c) the distributional properties of positive screens. Data came from a prospective cohort study (n = 1,604). Results suggest that the M-CHAT can appropriately be administered to children aged 20–48 months. Documented explanations provided by mothers during screening, appear to effectively identify potential screen misclassifications in the absence of the follow-up telephone interviews. This further emphasizes the importance of clinician expertise in verifying positive M-CHAT screens. Results have implications for the administration of the M-CHAT in clinical and research settings.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disordersAutismModified checklist for autism in toddlersM-CHATToddlersDevelopmental screening

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011