Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 41, Issue 4, pp 455–464

‘Everyday Memory’ Impairments in Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Catherine R. G. Jones
  • Francesca Happé
  • Andrew Pickles
  • Anita J. S. Marsden
  • Jenifer Tregay
  • Gillian Baird
  • Emily Simonoff
  • Tony Charman
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-010-1067-y

Cite this article as:
Jones, C.R.G., Happé, F., Pickles, A. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2011) 41: 455. doi:10.1007/s10803-010-1067-y

Abstract

‘Everyday memory’ is conceptualised as memory within the context of day-to-day life and, despite its functional relevance, has been little studied in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the first study of its kind, 94 adolescents with an ASD and 55 without an ASD completed measures of everyday memory from the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT) and a standard word recall task (Children’s Auditory Verbal Learning Test-2: CAVLT-2). The ASD group showed significant impairments on the RBMT, including in prospective memory, alongside impaired performance on the CAVLT-2. Social and communication ability was significantly associated with prospective remembering in an everyday memory context but not with the CAVLT-2. The complex nature of everyday memory and its relevance to ASD is discussed.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disordersEveryday memoryProspective memoryRivermead Behavioural Memory TestChildren’s Auditory Verbal Learning Test-2

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine R. G. Jones
    • 1
  • Francesca Happé
    • 2
  • Andrew Pickles
    • 3
  • Anita J. S. Marsden
    • 4
  • Jenifer Tregay
    • 4
  • Gillian Baird
    • 5
  • Emily Simonoff
    • 6
  • Tony Charman
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human DevelopmentInstitute of EducationLondonUK
  2. 2.MRC SDGP CentreInstitute of Psychiatry, King’s College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Biostatistics Group, School of Community-Based MedicineUniversity of ManchesterLondonUK
  4. 4.UCL Institute of Child HealthLondonUK
  5. 5.Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation TrustLondonUK
  6. 6.Department of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryInstitute of Psychiatry, King’s College LondonLondonUK