Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 342–351

Psychotropic Medication Use Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders Enrolled in a National Registry, 2007–2008

Authors

  • Rebecca E. Rosenberg
    • Department of Medical InformaticsKennedy Krieger Institute
  • David S. Mandell
    • Center for Mental Health Policy and Services ResearchUniversity of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
  • Janet E. Farmer
    • Thompson Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental DisordersUniversity of Missouri
  • J. Kiely Law
    • Department of Medical InformaticsKennedy Krieger Institute
    • Department of PediatricsJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
  • Alison R. Marvin
    • Department of Medical InformaticsKennedy Krieger Institute
    • Department of Medical InformaticsKennedy Krieger Institute
    • Department of PediatricsJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-009-0878-1

Cite this article as:
Rosenberg, R.E., Mandell, D.S., Farmer, J.E. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2010) 40: 342. doi:10.1007/s10803-009-0878-1

Abstract

Patterns of current psychotropic medication use among 5,181 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) enrolled in a Web-based registry were examined. Overall, 35% used at least one psychotropic medication, most commonly stimulants, neuroleptics, and/or antidepressants. Those who were uninsured or exclusively privately insured were less likely to use ≥3 medications than were those insured by Medicaid. Psychiatrists and neurologists prescribed the majority of psychotropic medications. In multivariate analysis, older age, presence of intellectual disability or psychiatric comorbidity, and residing in a poorer county or in the South or Midwest regions of the United States increased the odds of psychotropic medication use. Factors external to clinical presentation likely affect odds of psychotropic medication use among children with ASD.

Keywords

AutismAsperger syndromePervasive developmental disorderMedicationHealth disparity

Supplementary material

10803_2009_878_MOESM1_ESM.doc (36 kb)
(DOC 35 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009