Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 39, Issue 3, pp 395–404

Positive Effects of Methylphenidate on Social Communication and Self-Regulation in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders and Hyperactivity

  • Laudan B. Jahromi
  • Connie L. Kasari
  • James T. McCracken
  • Lisa S-Y. Lee
  • Michael G. Aman
  • Christopher J. McDougle
  • Lawrence Scahill
  • Elaine Tierney
  • L. Eugene Arnold
  • Benedetto Vitiello
  • Louise Ritz
  • Andrea Witwer
  • Erin Kustan
  • Jaswinder Ghuman
  • David J. Posey
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-008-0636-9

Cite this article as:
Jahromi, L.B., Kasari, C.L., McCracken, J.T. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2009) 39: 395. doi:10.1007/s10803-008-0636-9

Abstract

This report examined the effect of methylphenidate on social communication and self-regulation in children with pervasive developmental disorders and hyperactivity in a secondary analysis of RUPP Autism Network data. Participants were 33 children (29 boys) between the ages of 5 and 13 years who participated in a four-week crossover trial of placebo and increasing doses of methylphenidate given in random order each for one week. Observational measures of certain aspects of children’s social communication, self-regulation, and affective behavior were obtained each week. A significant positive effect of methylphenidate was seen on children’s use of joint attention initiations, response to bids for joint attention, self-regulation, and regulated affective state. The results go beyond the recent literature and suggest that methylphenidate may have positive effects on social behaviors in children with PDD and hyperactivity.

Keywords

MethylphenidatePervasive developmental disordersHyperactivityAutism spectrum disorder

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laudan B. Jahromi
    • 1
  • Connie L. Kasari
    • 2
  • James T. McCracken
    • 2
  • Lisa S-Y. Lee
    • 2
  • Michael G. Aman
    • 3
  • Christopher J. McDougle
    • 4
  • Lawrence Scahill
    • 5
  • Elaine Tierney
    • 6
  • L. Eugene Arnold
    • 3
  • Benedetto Vitiello
    • 7
  • Louise Ritz
    • 7
  • Andrea Witwer
    • 3
  • Erin Kustan
    • 5
  • Jaswinder Ghuman
    • 6
  • David J. Posey
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Social and Family DynamicsArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  4. 4.Indiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  5. 5.Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  6. 6.Kennedy Krieger InstituteBaltimoreUSA
  7. 7.National Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA