Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 38, Issue 9, pp 1777–1784

Brief Report: Feasibility of Social Cognition and Interaction Training for Adults with High Functioning Autism

  • Lauren M. Turner-Brown
  • Timothy D. Perry
  • Gabriel S. Dichter
  • James W. Bodfish
  • David L. Penn
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-008-0545-y

Cite this article as:
Turner-Brown, L.M., Perry, T.D., Dichter, G.S. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2008) 38: 1777. doi:10.1007/s10803-008-0545-y

Abstract

The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and utility of a group-based cognitive behavioral intervention to improve social-cognitive functioning in adults with high-functioning autism (HFA). We modified the treatment manual of a previously validated intervention, Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT), for optimal use with HFA adults (SCIT-A). We then conducted a pilot study to compare SCIT-A (n = 6) to treatment as usual (TAU) (n = 5) for adults with HFA. Feasibility was supported; attendance was high (92%) and satisfaction reports were primarily positive. Participants in SCIT-A showed significant improvement in theory-of-mind skills and trend level improvements in social communication skills; TAU participants did not show these improvements. Findings indicate SCIT-A shows promise as an intervention for adults with HFA.

Keywords

Social cognitionAdultsGroup interventionHigh functioning autism

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lauren M. Turner-Brown
    • 1
  • Timothy D. Perry
    • 2
  • Gabriel S. Dichter
    • 3
    • 4
  • James W. Bodfish
    • 3
  • David L. Penn
    • 2
  1. 1.Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research CenterUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of MedicineChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research CenterUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of MedicineChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.Duke-UNC Brain Imaging and Analysis CenterDurhamUSA