Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 38, Issue 7, pp 1320–1327

Adult Attitudes Toward Behaviors of a Six-year-old Boy with Autism

Authors

    • Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive, CNRS UMR 6024Université Blaise Pascal
  • Catherine Auxiette
    • Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive, CNRS UMR 6024Université Blaise Pascal
  • Carole Vansingle
    • Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive, CNRS UMR 6024Université Blaise Pascal
  • Sandrine Gil
    • Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive, CNRS UMR 6024Université Blaise Pascal
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-007-0519-5

Cite this article as:
Chambres, P., Auxiette, C., Vansingle, C. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2008) 38: 1320. doi:10.1007/s10803-007-0519-5

Abstract

Parents report that their children with autism are often judged as undisciplined and rude (e.g., Peeters, Autism: From theoretical understanding to educational intervention, 1997). The phenomenon of a negative view of individuals with autism was studied here. Four behaviors (two problematic and two non-problematic) produced by a six-year-old child with autism were assessed on social, emotional, and cognitive dimensions by 88 adults in an “informed” or “uninformed” condition. The child was perceived more positively when identified as having autism. However, this effect was dependent on the type of behavior and the evaluative dimension used. The results indicate that the mere fact of being informed of a child’s disability triggers the use of a different standard of comparison than that employed to evaluate typical children (Mussweiler and Strack, J Pers Soc Psychol 78:1038–1052, 2000).

Keywords

AutismProblematic and non-problematic behaviorsAttitudesStandard of comparison

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008