Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 37–48

Response to Joint Attention in Toddlers at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Prospective Study

  • Michelle Sullivan
  • Julianna Finelli
  • Alison Marvin
  • Elizabeth Garrett-Mayer
  • Margaret Bauman
  • Rebecca Landa
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-006-0335-3

Cite this article as:
Sullivan, M., Finelli, J., Marvin, A. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2007) 37: 37. doi:10.1007/s10803-006-0335-3

Abstract

Response to joint attention (RJA) is impaired in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and is pivotal to social and communication development. Response to joint attention was examined at 14 and 24 months in 51 children at high risk for autism (siblings of children with autism). Outcome groups at age 3 years included ASD (n = 16), broader autism phenotype (n = 8), and non-broader autism phenotype (n = 27). The ASD group made minimal improvement in RJA between 14 and 24 months, but stability of RJA across tasks increased for all three groups. Significantly, lower RJA was observed for the ASD group at 24 months. Response to joint attention performance at 14 months predicted ASD outcome. Response to joint attention is an important screening and early intervention target.

Keywords

Autism Joint attention Longitudinal Phenotype Siblings Social communication 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michelle Sullivan
    • 1
  • Julianna Finelli
    • 2
  • Alison Marvin
    • 2
  • Elizabeth Garrett-Mayer
    • 3
  • Margaret Bauman
    • 4
  • Rebecca Landa
    • 5
  1. 1.Institute on Disability/UCEDUniversity of New HampshireDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Center for Autism and Related DisordersKennedy Krieger InstituteBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of Oncology and Biostatistics, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Bloomberg School of Public HealthJohns Hopkins School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Departments of Pediatrics and NeurologyMassachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of Psychiatry, Center for Autism and Related DisordersKennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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