Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 37, Issue 5, pp 929–939

Abnormal Use of Facial Information in High-Functioning Autism

  • Michael L. Spezio
  • Ralph Adolphs
  • Robert S. E. Hurley
  • Joseph Piven
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-006-0232-9

Cite this article as:
Spezio, M.L., Adolphs, R., Hurley, R.S.E. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2007) 37: 929. doi:10.1007/s10803-006-0232-9

Abstract

Altered visual exploration of faces likely contributes to social cognition deficits seen in autism. To investigate the relationship between face gaze and social cognition in autism, we measured both face gaze and how facial regions were actually used during emotion judgments from faces. Compared to IQ-matched healthy controls, nine high-functioning adults with autism failed to make use of information from the eye region of faces, instead relying primarily on information from the mouth. Face gaze accounted for the increased reliance on the mouth, and partially accounted for the deficit in using information from the eyes. These findings provide a novel quantitative assessment of how people with autism utilize information in faces when making social judgments.

Keywords

Social cognitionEmotionEyetrackingBubblesFacial information

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael L. Spezio
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ralph Adolphs
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert S. E. Hurley
    • 3
  • Joseph Piven
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Humanities and Social Sciences, 228-77California Institute of TechnologyCaltech, PasadenaUSA
  2. 2.Computation and Neural SystemsCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA
  3. 3.Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research CenterUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA