Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 63–73

Weak Central Coherence and Its Relations to Theory of Mind and Anxiety in Autism

  • Courtney P. Burnette
  • Peter C. Mundy
  • Jessica A. Meyer
  • Steven K. Sutton
  • Amy E. Vaughan
  • David Charak
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-004-1035-5

Cite this article as:
Burnette, C.P., Mundy, P.C., Meyer, J.A. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2005) 35: 63. doi:10.1007/s10803-004-1035-5

Abstract

Recent theory and research suggests that weak central coherence, a specific perceptual-cognitive style, underlies the central disturbance in autism. This study sought to provide a test of the weak central coherence hypothesis. In addition, this study explored the relations between the weak central coherence hypothesis, theory of mind skills, and social-emotional functioning in a group of high functioning children with autism. Results revealed equivocal support for the weak central coherence hypothesis, but found moderate correlations between verbal weak central coherence and theory of mind measures. No significant findings were observed between weak central coherence measures and social-emotional functioning.

Keywords

weak central coherence anxiety theory of mind high functioning autism comorbidity social-emotional functioning 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Courtney P. Burnette
    • 1
    • 3
  • Peter C. Mundy
    • 1
  • Jessica A. Meyer
    • 2
  • Steven K. Sutton
    • 1
  • Amy E. Vaughan
    • 1
  • David Charak
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MiamiCoral GablesUSA
  2. 2.Tavistock ClinicUniversity College of LondonUK
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MiamiUSA

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