Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 467–477

Suicidal Ideation of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents has One-Year Predictive Validity for Suicide Attempts in Girls Only

  • Cheryl A. King
  • Qingmei Jiang
  • Ewa K. Czyz
  • David C. R. Kerr
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10802-013-9794-0

Cite this article as:
King, C.A., Jiang, Q., Czyz, E.K. et al. J Abnorm Child Psychol (2014) 42: 467. doi:10.1007/s10802-013-9794-0

Abstract

Clinicians commonly incorporate adolescents’ self-reported suicidal ideation into formulations regarding adolescents’ risk for suicide. Data are limited, however, regarding the extent to which adolescent boys’ and girls’ reports of suicidal ideation have clinically significant predictive validity in terms of subsequent suicidal behavior. This study examined psychiatrically hospitalized adolescent boys’ and girls’ self-reported suicidal ideation as a predictor of suicide attempts during the first year following hospitalization. A total of 354 adolescents (97 boys; 257 girls; ages 13–17 years) hospitalized for acute suicide risk were evaluated at the time of hospitalization as well as 3, 6, and 12 months later. Study measures included the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Junior, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Youth Self-Report, and Personal Experiences Screen Questionnaire. The main study outcome was presence and number of suicide attempt(s) in the year after hospitalization, measured by the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Results indicated a significant interaction between suicidal ideation, assessed during first week of hospitalization, and gender for the prediction of subsequent suicide attempts. Suicidal ideation was a significant predictor of subsequent suicide attempts for girls, but not boys. Baseline history of multiple suicide attempts was a significant predictor of subsequent suicide attempts across genders. Results support the importance of empirically validating suicide risk assessment strategies separately for adolescent boys and girls. Among adolescent boys who have been hospitalized due to acute suicide risk, low levels of self-reported suicidal ideation may not be indicative of low risk for suicidal behavior following hospitalization.

Keywords

Suicidal ideationSuicide risk assessmentAdolescenceGender differences in suicide risk

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheryl A. King
    • 1
    • 5
  • Qingmei Jiang
    • 2
  • Ewa K. Czyz
    • 1
  • David C. R. Kerr
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and PsychologyUniversity of Michigan Depression Center, University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health ResearchUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.School of Psychological ScienceOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  4. 4.Oregon Social Learning CenterEugeneUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA