Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 149–161

ADHD and Working Memory: The Impact of Central Executive Deficits and Exceeding Storage/Rehearsal Capacity on Observed Inattentive Behavior

  • Michael J. Kofler
  • Mark D. Rapport
  • Jennifer Bolden
  • Dustin E. Sarver
  • Joseph S. Raiker
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10802-009-9357-6

Cite this article as:
Kofler, M.J., Rapport, M.D., Bolden, J. et al. J Abnorm Child Psychol (2010) 38: 149. doi:10.1007/s10802-009-9357-6

Abstract

Inattentive behavior is considered a core and pervasive feature of ADHD; however, an alternative model challenges this premise and hypothesizes a functional relationship between working memory deficits and inattentive behavior. The current study investigated whether inattentive behavior in children with ADHD is functionally related to the domain-general central executive and/or subsidiary storage/rehearsal components of working memory. Objective observations of children’s attentive behavior by independent observers were conducted while children with ADHD (n = 15) and typically developing children (n = 14) completed counterbalanced tasks that differentially manipulated central executive, phonological storage/rehearsal, and visuospatial storage/rehearsal demands. Results of latent variable and effect size confidence interval analyses revealed two conditions that completely accounted for the attentive behavior deficits in children with ADHD: (a) placing demands on central executive processing, the effect of which is evident under even low cognitive loads, and (b) exceeding storage/rehearsal capacity, which has similar effects on children with ADHD and typically developing children but occurs at lower cognitive loads for children with ADHD.

Keywords

ADHDWorking memoryAttentionCentral executive

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Kofler
    • 1
  • Mark D. Rapport
    • 1
  • Jennifer Bolden
    • 1
  • Dustin E. Sarver
    • 1
  • Joseph S. Raiker
    • 1
  1. 1.Children’s Learning Clinic-IV, Department of PsychologyUniversity of Central FloridaOrlandoUSA