Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 230–241

Factors Moderating Children's Adjustment to Parental Separation: Findings From a Community Study in England

Authors

  • Helen Cheng
    • Social Genetic and Development Psychiatry Research CentreKing's College London
    • Social Genetic and Development Psychiatry Research CentreKing's College London
    • SGDP Research Center, Institute of PsychiatryKing's College London
  • Thomas G. O'Connor
    • University of Rochester Medical Center
  • Jean Golding
    • Department of Child HealthUniversity of Bristol
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10802-005-9013-8

Cite this article as:
Cheng, H., Dunn, J., O'Connor, T.G. et al. J Abnorm Child Psychol (2006) 34: 230. doi:10.1007/s10802-005-9013-8

Research findings show that there is marked variability in children's response to parental separation, but few studies identify the sources of this variation. This prospective longitudinal study examines the factors modifying children's adjustment to parental separation in a community sample of 5,635 families in England. Children's behavioral/emotional problems were assessed when children were aged 47 and 81 months; marital quality, maternal depression, socioeconomic circumstances, and demographic variables were assessed prior to the separation from maternal report. Results indicated that 346 mothers separated from their partners in the 3-year period. Preseparation differences were found for measures of family process and parent risk factors, with effect sizes ranging from small to trivial. Parental separation was associated with a significant but modest increase in behavioral/emotional problems, independent of marital quality, maternal depression, socioeconomic circumstances, and demographic variables. Moderation analyses showed that children of cohabiting parents had a greater increase in adjustment problems following parental separation than children of married parents. Further research elucidating the factors that moderate children's adjustment to parental separation is needed to improve our understanding of who may most likely benefit from preventive interventions.

KEY WORDS:

parental separation marital relationship quality longitudinal studies child adjustment

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006