Journal of Applied Electrochemistry

, 39:1695

Enhancing aluminum corrosion in water

Authors

    • Department of Materials EngineeringUniversity of British Colombia
  • A. Alfantazi
    • Department of Materials EngineeringUniversity of British Colombia
  • T. Troczynski
    • Department of Materials EngineeringUniversity of British Colombia
Original paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10800-009-9862-x

Cite this article as:
Skrovan, J., Alfantazi, A. & Troczynski, T. J Appl Electrochem (2009) 39: 1695. doi:10.1007/s10800-009-9862-x

Abstract

For small particles of aluminum (<60 μm), a measurable percentage of the aluminum (>5%) is observed to corrode before passivation occurs at moderate temperatures (>50 °C) in de-ionized water within 1 h. Ball-milling of the aluminum powders with aluminum oxide or water soluble salts results in a significant increase in both the rate of corrosion and the extent of corrosion before passivation. The resulting release of hydrogen gas is of commercial interest for portable hydrogen supply systems. This paper investigates the effect of temperature increase, pH shift, and change of surface area during milling, on the corrosion rate of aluminum powders in water.

Keywords

AluminumBall-millingCorrosionHydrogen

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009