International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 32, Issue 6, pp 1311–1324

Social Structure Affects Initiations of Group Movements but Not Recruitment Success in Japanese Macaques (Macaca fuscata)

Authors

  • Armand Jacobs
    • Evolutionary Ethology Team, Department of Ecology, Physiology and Ethology, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert CurienUniversité de Strasbourg
    • CNRS, UMR7178
    • Primate Research Institute, Department of Ecology and Social BehaviorKyoto University
  • Kunio Watanabe
    • Primate Research Institute, Department of Ecology and Social BehaviorKyoto University
    • Evolutionary Ethology Team, Department of Ecology, Physiology and Ethology, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert CurienUniversité de Strasbourg
    • CNRS, UMR7178
    • Social Ecology UnitFree University of Brussels
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10764-011-9554-3

Cite this article as:
Jacobs, A., Watanabe, K. & Petit, O. Int J Primatol (2011) 32: 1311. doi:10.1007/s10764-011-9554-3
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Abstract

Research on collective movements has often focused on the sociodemographic parameters explaining the success of some individuals as leaders or initiators of collective movements. Several of these studies have shown the influence of social structure, through kinship and affiliative relationships, on the organization of collective movements. However, these studies have been conducted on semi-free-ranging groups of macaques that were not faced with a natural environment and its constraints. In the socially intolerant rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) the success of an initiator correlates with its hierarchical rank, the most dominant individuals being the most successful. We investigated the collective movements of another socially intolerant macaque species, Japanese macaques, in the wild, to assess whether the social structure was still a determinant factor under natural conditions. In line with previous studies of macaques, we found that social structure drove the organization of collective movements. More dominant individuals initiated more collective movements. However, dominance did not affect the success of an initiation, i.e., the number of individuals joining. In addition, kinship strongly constrained the associations observed in females during collective movements. These results reflect the social structure of Japanese macaques, in which strong power asymmetry and kinship relationships constrain the majority of interactions between individuals within the group. Moreover, these results are similar to those observed in semi-free-ranging rhesus macaques and support the hypothesis of an effect of social determinants on collective movements of primates even under natural conditions.

Keywords

Collective decision makingKinshipMacaca fuscataSocial structure

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011