International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 31, Issue 6, pp 1107–1122

Tarsius wallacei: A New Tarsier Species from Central Sulawesi Occupies a Discontinuous Range

Authors

    • Department of Ecology and EvolutionJohann-Wolfgang-Goethe University Frankfurt
    • Institute of AnthropologyJohannes-Gutenberg University Mainz
  • Christine Driller
    • Institute of AnthropologyJohannes-Gutenberg University Mainz
  • Hadi Dahruddin
    • Division of ZoologyResearch Center for Biology-LIPI
  • Wirdateti
    • Division of ZoologyResearch Center for Biology-LIPI
  • Walberto Sinaga
    • Primate Research CenterBogor Agricultural University
  • Dyah Perwitasari-Farajallah
    • Primate Research CenterBogor Agricultural University
    • Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics & Natural SciencesBogor Agricultural University
  • Myron Shekelle
    • tarsier.org
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10764-010-9452-0

Cite this article as:
Merker, S., Driller, C., Dahruddin, H. et al. Int J Primatol (2010) 31: 1107. doi:10.1007/s10764-010-9452-0

Abstract

On the basis of distinguishing characteristics of various genetic markers, pelage color, tail tuft, and vocalizations, we describe a new species of the genus Tarsius Storr 1780. The new taxon Tarsius wallacei sp. nov. occupies a disjunct range in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. The two isolated populations differ significantly in body size, but are alike in color, tail tuft dimensions, vocalizations, and genetic composition. Morphologically, the new species is similar to other Sulawesi lowland tarsiers. In the field, it can be distinguished from its congeners via a characteristic duet song and its yellow-brown pelage coloration and a copper-colored throat. Genetic analyses prove Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences and also microsatellite allele frequencies to be absolutely diagnostic.

Keywords

Cytochrome bDuet songMicrosatellitesPrimateSRYTinombo form

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010