International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 259–277

Simple Reaching Is Not So Simple: Association Between Hand Use and Grip Preferences in Captive Chimpanzees

  • William D. Hopkins
  • Jamie L. Russell
  • Michelle Hook
  • Stephanie Braccini
  • Steven J. Schapiro
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10764-005-2924-y

Cite this article as:
Hopkins, W.D., Russell, J.L., Hook, M. et al. Int J Primatol (2005) 26: 259. doi:10.1007/s10764-005-2924-y

Abstract

We assessed the relationship between grip preference and hand use in chimpanzees in 2 experiments. In experiment 1, we evaluated consistency in hand use and grip preference across 4 food types. The chimpanzees showed population-level right-handedness and there are significant positive associations for both hand and grip use across food types. In experiment 2, we assessed validity of hand use in relation to grip preference in 2 colonies of chimpanzees via the same methodology. Differences in hand preferences between colonies were associated with variation in the observed grip preferences. There was no evidence of rearing effects on handedness in either colony. We discuss the overall results in the context of the evolution of handedness in relation to increasing motor demands as manifest in variation on grasping behavior.

Keywords

Chimpanzeehand preferencegrip preference

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • William D. Hopkins
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  • Jamie L. Russell
    • 1
  • Michelle Hook
    • 3
  • Stephanie Braccini
    • 4
  • Steven J. Schapiro
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Division of PsychobiologyYerkes National Primate Research CenterAtlanta
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyBerry CollegeMount Berry
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyTexas A&M University, College Station
  4. 4.Department of Veterinary SciencesThe University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer CenterBastrop
  5. 5.Department of PsychologySouthwestern UniversityGeorgetown
  6. 6.Division of Psychobiology, Living Links Center, Yerkes Primate Research CenterEmory UniversityAtlanta