CHILDREN’S GESTURES AND THE EMBODIED KNOWLEDGE OF GEOMETRY

Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10763-010-9240-5

Cite this article as:
Kim, M., Roth, WM. & Thom, J. Int J of Sci and Math Educ (2011) 9: 207. doi:10.1007/s10763-010-9240-5

ABSTRACT

There is mounting research evidence that contests the metaphysical perspective of knowing as mental process detached from the physical world. Yet education, especially in its teaching and learning practices, continues to treat knowledge as something that is necessarily and solely expressed in ideal verbal form. This study is part of a funded project that investigates the role of the body in knowing and learning mathematics. Based on a 3-week (15 1-h lessons) video study of 1-s grade mathematics classroom (N = 24), we identify 4 claims: (a) gestures support children’s thinking and knowing, (b) gestures co-emerge with peers’ gestures in interactive situations, (c) gestures cope with the abstractness of concepts, and (d) children’s bodies exhibit geometrical knowledge. We conclude that children think and learn through their bodies. Our study suggests to educators that conventional images of knowledge as being static and abstract in nature need to be rethought so that it not only takes into account verbal and written languages and text but also recognizes the necessary ways in which children’s knowledge is embodied in and expressed through their bodies.

KEY WORDS

embodiment of learning geometrical knowledge gestures 

Copyright information

© National Science Council, Taiwan 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of EducationNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.University of VictoriaVictoriaCanada