Inflammation

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 1530–1537

Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Proliferation of the Vasa Vasorum in a Rabbit Model of Atherosclerosis as Evaluated by Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging and Histology

Authors

  • Jinwei Tian
    • Key Laboratories of Education Ministry for Myocardial Ischemia Mechanism and Treatment, Department of CardiologySecond Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University
  • Sining Hu
    • Key Laboratories of Education Ministry for Myocardial Ischemia Mechanism and Treatment, Department of CardiologySecond Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University
  • Xue Han
    • Department of UltrasoundThird Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University
  • Nana Dong
    • Key Laboratories of Education Ministry for Myocardial Ischemia Mechanism and Treatment, Department of CardiologySecond Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University
  • Huai Yu
    • Key Laboratories of Education Ministry for Myocardial Ischemia Mechanism and Treatment, Department of CardiologySecond Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University
  • Yanli Sun
    • Key Laboratories of Education Ministry for Myocardial Ischemia Mechanism and Treatment, Department of CardiologySecond Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University
    • Key Laboratories of Education Ministry for Myocardial Ischemia Mechanism and Treatment, Department of CardiologySecond Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10753-012-9468-z

Cite this article as:
Tian, J., Hu, S., Han, X. et al. Inflammation (2012) 35: 1530. doi:10.1007/s10753-012-9468-z

Abstract

Whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can promote vasa vasorum (VV) proliferation for atherosclerosis in vivo is unclear. Eighteen rabbits with atherosclerosis were randomly assigned into one of three groups of six. Group A received biweekly injections of 10 mL saline after 2 weeks of balloon injury. Groups B and C received biweekly intravenous injections of 3.0 μg LPS in 10 mL saline at weeks 10 and 4, respectively, until study termination. LPS significantly increased the levels of triglycerides and C-reactive protein and decreased the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Group C had significant larger plaques and more macrophages than group A (p = 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively). Contrast enhancement ultrasound imaging and histological detection demonstrated that plaques in group C had a significantly higher VV density than that in group A (p = 0.009 and p = 0.002, respectively). In summary, VV proliferation for plaque destabilization can be accelerated by LPS-induced systemic inflammation and changes in lipid profiles.

KEY WORDS

atherosclerosiscontrast enhancement ultrasoundinflammationlipopolysaccharidevasa vasorum

Supplementary material

10753_2012_9468_MOESM1_ESM.doc (74 kb)
Supplementary Table 1Lipid profile and CRP level in experimental rabbits (DOC 74 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012