Inflammation

, Volume 31, Issue 3, pp 167–179

IL-17 Producing γδ T Cells are Required for a Controlled Inflammatory Response after Bleomycin-induced Lung Injury

  • Ruedi K. Braun
  • Christina Ferrick
  • Paul Neubauer
  • Michael Sjoding
  • Anja Sterner-Kock
  • Martin Kock
  • Lei Putney
  • David A. Ferrick
  • Dallas M. Hyde
  • Robert B. Love
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10753-008-9062-6

Cite this article as:
Braun, R.K., Ferrick, C., Neubauer, P. et al. Inflammation (2008) 31: 167. doi:10.1007/s10753-008-9062-6

Background

γδ T cells play a key role in the regulation of inflammatory responses in epithelial tissue, and in adaptive immunity, as γδ T cell deficient mice have a severely impaired capacity to clear lung pathogens. γδ T cells regulate the initial inflammatory response to microbial invasion and thereby protect against tissue injury. Here we examined the response of γδ T cells to lung injury induced by bleomycin, in an effort to study the inflammatory response in the absence of any adaptive immune response to a pathogen.

Results

After lung injury by bleomycin, we localized the γδ T cells to the lung lesions. γδ T cells were the predominant source of IL-17 (as detected by flow cytometry and real-time PCR). Moreover, γδ T cell knockout mice showed a significant reduction in cellular infiltration into the airways, reduced expression of IL-6 in the lung, and a significant delay in epithelial repair.

Conclusion

Mouse γδ T cells produce IL-17 in response to lung injury and are required for an organized inflammatory response and epithelial repair. The lack of γδ T cells correlates with increased inflammation and fibrosis.

Key words

γδ T cellbleomycinlung fibrosisIL-17

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruedi K. Braun
    • 1
    • 5
  • Christina Ferrick
    • 2
  • Paul Neubauer
    • 1
  • Michael Sjoding
    • 1
  • Anja Sterner-Kock
    • 3
  • Martin Kock
    • 3
  • Lei Putney
    • 2
  • David A. Ferrick
    • 4
  • Dallas M. Hyde
    • 2
  • Robert B. Love
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Thoracic and CV SurgeryLoyola UniversityMaywoodUSA
  2. 2.California National Primate Research CenterUniversity of California, DavisDavisUSA
  3. 3.Veterinary PathologyFreie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany
  4. 4.Seahorse BioscienceNorth BillericaUSA
  5. 5.Department of Thoracic and CV SurgeryLoyola UniversityMaywoodUSA