Hydrobiologia

, Volume 581, Issue 1, pp 269–285

Restoration of shallow lakes by nutrient control and biomanipulation—the successful strategy varies with lake size and climate

Authors

    • Department of Freshwater EcologyNational Environmental Research Institute
    • Department of Plant BiologyUniversity of Aarhus
  • M. Meerhoff
    • Department of Freshwater EcologyNational Environmental Research Institute
    • Department of Plant BiologyUniversity of Aarhus
    • Departamento de Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias
  • B. A. Jacobsen
    • Frederiksborg Amt, Technical Department
  • R. S. Hansen
    • Frederiksborg Amt, Technical Department
  • M. Søndergaard
    • Department of Freshwater EcologyNational Environmental Research Institute
  • J. P. Jensen
    • Department of Freshwater EcologyNational Environmental Research Institute
  • T. L. Lauridsen
    • Department of Freshwater EcologyNational Environmental Research Institute
  • N. Mazzeo
    • Departamento de Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias
  • C. W. C. Branco
    • Departamento de Ciências NaturaisUniversidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro
Eutrophication in Lakes

DOI: 10.1007/s10750-006-0507-3

Cite this article as:
Jeppesen, E., Meerhoff, M., Jacobsen, B.A. et al. Hydrobiologia (2007) 581: 269. doi:10.1007/s10750-006-0507-3
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Abstract

Major efforts have been made world-wide to improve the ecological quality of shallow lakes by reducing external nutrient loading. These have often resulted in lower in-lake total phosphorus (TP) and decreased chlorophyll a levels in surface water, reduced phytoplankton biomass and higher Secchi depth. Internal loading delays recovery, but in north temperate lakes a new equilibrium with respect to TP often is reached after <10–15 years. In comparison, the response time to reduced nitrogen (N) loading is typically <5 years. Also increased top-down control may be important. Fish biomass often declines, and the percentage of piscivores, the zooplankton:phytoplankton biomass ratio, the contribution of Daphnia to zooplankton biomass and the cladoceran size all tend to increase. This holds for both small and relatively large lakes, for example, the largest lake in Denmark (40 km2), shallow Lake Arresø, has responded relatively rapidly to a ca. 76% loading reduction arising from nutrient reduction and top-down control. Some lakes, however, have proven resistant to loading reductions. To accelerate recovery several physico-chemical and biological restoration methods have been developed for north temperate lakes and used with varying degrees of success. Biological measures, such as selective removal of planktivorous fish, stocking of piscivorous fish and implantation or protection of submerged plants, often are cheap versus traditional physico-chemical methods and are therefore attractive. However, their long-term effectiveness is uncertain. It is argued that additional measures beyond loading reduction are less cost-efficient and often not needed in very large lakes. Although fewer data are available on tropical lakes these seem to respond to external loading reductions, an example being Lake Paranoá, Brazil (38 km2). However, differences in biological interactions between cold temperate versus warm temperate-subtropical-tropical lakes make transfer of existing biological restoration methods to warm lakes difficult. Warm lakes often have prolonged growth seasons with a higher risk of long-lasting algal blooms and dense floating plant communities, smaller fish, higher aggregation of fish in vegetation (leading to loss of zooplankton refuge), more annual fish cohorts, more omnivorous feeding by fish and less specialist piscivory. The trophic structures of warm lakes vary markedly, depending on precipitation, continental or coastal regions locations, lake age and temperature. Unfortunately, little is known about trophic dynamics and the role of fish in warm lakes. Since many warm lakes suffer from eutrophication, new insights are needed into trophic interactions and potential lake restoration methods, especially since eutrophication is expected to increase in the future owing to economic development and global warming.

Keywords

Lake restorationLarge lakesRecoveryNutrient loading reductionClimate

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007