Hydrobiologia

, Volume 566, Issue 1, pp 267–280

Occurrence and variability of River Habitat Survey features across Europe and the consequences for data collection and evaluation

Authors

    • Department of Ecology and Environmental ProtectionAugust Cieszkowski Agricultural University
  • Andrea Buffagni
    • CNR-IRSA Water Research Institute
  • John Davy-Bowker
    • Centre for Ecology and HydrologyWinfrith Technology Centre
  • Jacek Lesny
    • Department of AgrometeorologyAugust Cieszkowski Agricultural University
  • Bogdan H. Chojnicki
    • Department of AgrometeorologyAugust Cieszkowski Agricultural University
  • Janina Zbierska
    • Department of Ecology and Environmental ProtectionAugust Cieszkowski Agricultural University
  • Ryszard Staniszewski
    • Department of Ecology and Environmental ProtectionAugust Cieszkowski Agricultural University
  • Tomasz Zgola
    • Department of Ecology and Environmental ProtectionAugust Cieszkowski Agricultural University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10750-006-0090-7

Cite this article as:
Szoszkiewicz, K., Buffagni, A., Davy-Bowker, J. et al. Hydrobiologia (2006) 566: 267. doi:10.1007/s10750-006-0090-7

Abstract

River Habitat Survey (RHS) data collected for the EU-funded STAR project was used to identify hydromorphological characteristic features of rivers in four European regions namely: lowlands; mountain; the Alps; and the Mediterranean. Using RHS attributes, Habitat Quality Assessment (HQA) – a measure of natural habitat diversity, and Habitat Modification Score (HMS) – a measure of anthropogenic modification, we identified considerable differences in frequency, diversity and evenness of features between the regions. A relatively small subset of features clearly distinguish the hydromorphological characters of lowland, Alpine and southern European rivers. It was more difficult to distinguish mountain rivers from Alpine rivers. The highest statistical differences are observed between Lowland and Mountain region. Within the four regions studied the RHS attributes that most strongly influence the HQA and HMS indices were identified. We conclude that specific effort should be made to ensure these are recorded properly as part of the quality control of RHS data.

Keywords

River Habitat Surveyhydromorphologyvariabilitydata qualityriver assessment

Supplementary material

supp.doc (232 kb)
Supplementary material

Copyright information

© Springer 2006