Hydrobiologia

, Volume 542, Issue 1, pp 335–366

Phylogeographic history of the genus Tropheus, a lineage of rock-dwelling cichlid fishes endemic to Lake Tanganyika

  • Christian Sturmbauer
  • Stephan Koblmüller
  • Kristina M. Sefc
  • Nina Duftner
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10750-004-4664-y

Cite this article as:
Sturmbauer, C., Koblmüller, S., Sefc, K.M. et al. Hydrobiologia (2005) 542: 335. doi:10.1007/s10750-004-4664-y

Abstract

Lake Tanganyika contains the oldest and most complex flock of cichlid fishes counting about 200 endemic species. It is comprised of 16 ecologically, morphologically and genetically highly distinct tribes. Many species are further subdivided into arrays of geographic morphs, each colonizing particular sections of the shore line. The genus Tropheus represents the most spectacular and best studied example for this phenomenon, counting more than 100 distinctly colored populations and sister species, some living in sympatry. Their present distribution and genetic structure was shaped by a series of lake level fluctuations which caused cycles of isolation and secondary admixis. The present study extends previous work on the phylogeography of Tropheus and aims at the fine-scale reconstruction of the origin and spread of lineages in the central and southern basin of the lake. The previously defined mtDNA lineages were evaluated on the basis of statistical parsimony networks. Haplotype networks were created for each lineage and related to their centers of diversity in terms of present distribution. A linearized tree analysis and a mismatch distribution analysis corroborate two of the three radiation waves suggested in earlier works, but the new data suggest a different primary colonization scenario for the southern basin.

Keywords

mtDNA sequences control region molecular phylogeny allopatric speciation adaptive radiation 

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Sturmbauer
    • 1
  • Stephan Koblmüller
    • 1
  • Kristina M. Sefc
    • 1
  • Nina Duftner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of GrazGrazAustria