Human Ecology

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 35–45

Modern Hunting Practices and Wild Meat Trade in the Oil Palm Plantation-Dominated Landscapes of Sumatra, Indonesia

Authors

    • Department of Environmental Science, Policy and ManagementUniversity of California at Berkeley
  • E. D. Christina
    • Department of Environmental Science, Policy and ManagementUniversity of California at Berkeley
  • L. C. Kelley
    • Department of Environmental Science, Policy and ManagementUniversity of California at Berkeley
  • M. D. Potts
    • Department of Environmental Science, Policy and ManagementUniversity of California at Berkeley
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10745-013-9606-8

Cite this article as:
Luskin, M.S., Christina, E.D., Kelley, L.C. et al. Hum Ecol (2014) 42: 35. doi:10.1007/s10745-013-9606-8

Abstract

The ongoing expansion of plantation agriculture has changed the ecological, demographic, and social conditions of Southeast Asia’s forested areas, yet little is known about hunting practices in these novel landscapes. Using information from 73 in-depth interviews with hunters, agricultural workers and wild meat dealers in the Jambi province of Sumatra, Indonesia, we describe contemporary hunting practices, including how hunting methods, wildlife harvest and consumption rates vary between different indigenous and immigrant ethnic groups. Hunting is now primarily a commercial endeavor for harvesting wild boar (Sus scrofa) meat; over 7500 wild boars were sold in Jambi City alone in 2011. The Muslim majority avoids wild boar for religious reasons, but there is substantial local and export demand driven by Chinese and Christian Batak. We conclude that hunting within oil palm plantations may reduce crop damage from wild boar and also yield large amounts of wild meat with relatively little by-catch of threatened animals.

Keywords

Wildlife harvestBushmeatTropical rain forestHuman-wildlife conflictPalm oilRubberWild boar (Sus scrofa)LivelihoodsJambiSoutheast AsiaSustainable hunting

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013