Higher Education

, Volume 59, Issue 5, pp 543–565

The impact of new public management instruments on PhD education

Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10734-009-9264-3

Cite this article as:
Schneider, P. & Sadowski, D. High Educ (2010) 59: 543. doi:10.1007/s10734-009-9264-3

Abstract

New public governance emphasises less state, more market and more hierarchy as the cornerstones for effective steering of higher education institutions. Based on an explorative analysis of qualitative and quantitative data of fourteen German and European economics departments, we investigate the steering effects of six new public management instruments in the years 2001 and 2002 on subsequent placement success of PhD graduates. Using crisp set Qualitative Comparative Analysis to analyse the data, our results deliver strong support for the positive effects of competition for resources and the varying effects of hierarchy on PhD education. Governance of successful departments is characterised by two solutions: transparency over academic achievements as one single success factor in each solution or a combination of additionalfunding based on national competitive performance with either nopublic policy regulations for departments or nouniversity regulations for departments. Governance of unsuccessful departments is characterised by one solution: universityregulations for departments or a combination of noadditionalfunding based on nationalcompetitive performance and notransparency over academic achievements. Our results strengthen the strong impact of selected competitive mechanisms as an effective governance instrument and the partially detrimental effects of state regulations. University regulations turn out to be successful if they increase transparency over academic achievements by faculty members. Success is unlikely if those rules intervene into PhD education.

Keywords

New public management instruments Competition State regulation Hierarchy PhD education QCA 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the EU (IAAEG)University of TrierTrierGermany

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