Health Care Analysis

, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 165–180

Family Group Conferencing: A Theoretical Underpinning

  • Rosalie N. Metze
  • Tineke A. Abma
  • Rick H. Kwekkeboom
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10728-013-0263-2

Cite this article as:
Metze, R.N., Abma, T.A. & Kwekkeboom, R.H. Health Care Anal (2015) 23: 165. doi:10.1007/s10728-013-0263-2

Abstract

In the last decade, Family Group Conferences (FGCs) have increasingly been used to help people and their networks deal with their problems. The FGC fits well with the call for equal rights and self-management coming from clients and client movements, as well as the economy-driven pressure towards more informal and less professional care coming from governments. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the underlying theory to explain how the FGC works. In this article, we aim to provide such a theoretical basis by examining how the concept of empowerment can be linked with the basic assumptions underlying the FGC. Can making a plan of their own indeed help to empower people and if so, how does the process of empowerment proceed? Empowerment is often mentioned as a goal of the FGC, but authors are not unanimous when it comes to the operationalisation of empowerment, especially on the relational level of the person in his or her social context. In the article, we use the concepts of relational autonomy and resilience to conceptualize empowerment on the relational and individual level.

Keywords

EmpowermentFamily Group ConferencingRelational autonomyResilience

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosalie N. Metze
    • 1
  • Tineke A. Abma
    • 2
  • Rick H. Kwekkeboom
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Centre for Society and LawAmsterdam University of Applied Social SciencesAmsterdamNetherlands
  2. 2.Department of Medical Humanities, EMGO + Research InstituteVU University Medical CentreAmsterdamNetherlands