Genetica

, Volume 128, Issue 1, pp 373–384

The association between inversion In(3R)Payne and clinally varying traits in Drosophila melanogaster

  • L. Rako
  • A. R. Anderson
  • C. M. Sgrò
  • A. J. Stocker
  • A. A. Hoffmann
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10709-006-7375-7

Cite this article as:
Rako, L., Anderson, A.R., Sgrò, C.M. et al. Genetica (2006) 128: 373. doi:10.1007/s10709-006-7375-7

Abstract

In Drosophila melanogaster, inversion In(3R)Payne increases in frequency towards low latitudes and has been putatively associated with variation in size and thermal resistance, traits that also vary clinally. To assess the association between size and inversion, we obtained isofemale lines of inverted and standard karyotype of In(3R)Payne from the ends of the Australian D. melanogaster east coast cline. In the northern population, there was a significant association between In(3R)Payne and body size, with standard lines from this population being relatively larger than inverted lines. In contrast, the inversion had no influence on development time or cold resistance. We strengthened our findings further in a separate study with flies from populations from the middle of the cline as well as from the cline ends. These flies were scored for wing size and the presence of In(3R)Payne using a molecular marker. In females, the inversion accounted for around 30% of the size difference between cline ends, while in males the equivalent figure was 60%. Adaptive shifts in size but not in the other traits are therefore likely to have involved genes closely associated with In(3R)Payne. Because the size difference between karyotypes was similar in different populations, there was no evidence for coadaptation within populations.

Keywords

body sizeclinedevelopment timeDrosophilaIn(3R)Pthermal resistance

Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Rako
    • 1
  • A. R. Anderson
    • 2
  • C. M. Sgrò
    • 1
  • A. J. Stocker
    • 1
  • A. A. Hoffmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Genetics Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research – CESARThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  2. 2.Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research – CESAR, Monash UniversityClaytonAustralia