Genetica

, Volume 122, Issue 1, pp 47–49

Towards a mutant map of the mouse – new models of neurological, behavioural, deafness, bone, renal and blood disorders

  • Sohaila Rastan
  • Tertius Hough
  • Amy Kierman
  • Rachel Hardisty
  • Alexandra Erven
  • Ian C. Gray
  • Stepanie Voeling
  • Adrian Isaacs
  • Hsun Tsai
  • Mark Strivens
  • Rebecca Washbourne
  • Claire Thornton
  • Simon Greenaway
  • Mazda Hewitt
  • Stefan McCormick
  • Rachael Selley
  • Christine Wells
  • Zuzanna Tymowska-Lalanne
  • Phil Roby
  • Philomena Mburu
  • Derek Rogers
  • Jim Hagan
  • Charlie Reavill
  • Kay Davies
  • Peter Glenister
  • Elizabeth M. C. Fisher
  • Josephine Martin
  • Lucy Vizor
  • Mark Bouzyk
  • David Kelsell
  • J. -L. Guenet
  • Karen P. Steel
  • Steve Sheardown
  • Nigel Spurr
  • Ian Gray
  • Jo Peters
  • Patrick M. Nolan
  • A. Jacqueline Hunter
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10709-004-1930-x

Cite this article as:
Rastan, S., Hough, T., Kierman, A. et al. Genetica (2004) 122: 47. doi:10.1007/s10709-004-1930-x

Abstract

With the completion of the first draft of the human genome sequence, the next major challenge is assigning function to genes. One approach is genome-wide random chemical mutagenesis, followed by screening for mutant phenotypes of interest and subsequent mapping and identification of the mutated genes in question. We (a consortium made up of GlaxoSmithKline, the MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit and Mouse Genome Centre, Harwell, Imperial College, London, and the Royal London Hospital) have used ENU mutagenesis in the mouse for the rapid generation of novel mutant phenotypes for use as animal models of human disease and for gene function assignment (Nolan et al., 2000). As of 2003, 35,000 mice have been produced to date in a genome-wide screen for dominant mutations and screened using a variety of screening protocols. Nearly 200 mutants have been confirmed as heritable and added to the mouse mutant catalogue and, overall, we can extrapolate that we have recovered over 700 mutants from the screening programme. For further information on the project and details of the data, see http://www.mgu.har.mrc.ac.uk/mutabase.

ENU mutagenesismouse mutants

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sohaila Rastan
    • 1
  • Tertius Hough
    • 2
  • Amy Kierman
    • 3
  • Rachel Hardisty
    • 2
  • Alexandra Erven
    • 3
  • Ian C. Gray
    • 1
  • Stepanie Voeling
    • 4
  • Adrian Isaacs
    • 5
  • Hsun Tsai
    • 2
  • Mark Strivens
    • 2
  • Rebecca Washbourne
    • 2
  • Claire Thornton
    • 2
  • Simon Greenaway
    • 2
  • Mazda Hewitt
    • 2
  • Stefan McCormick
    • 2
  • Rachael Selley
    • 2
  • Christine Wells
    • 2
  • Zuzanna Tymowska-Lalanne
    • 2
  • Phil Roby
    • 2
  • Philomena Mburu
    • 2
  • Derek Rogers
    • 1
  • Jim Hagan
    • 1
  • Charlie Reavill
    • 1
  • Kay Davies
    • 5
  • Peter Glenister
    • 2
  • Elizabeth M. C. Fisher
    • 6
  • Josephine Martin
    • 7
  • Lucy Vizor
    • 2
  • Mark Bouzyk
    • 1
  • David Kelsell
    • 1
  • J. -L. Guenet
    • 8
  • Karen P. Steel
    • 3
  • Steve Sheardown
    • 1
  • Nigel Spurr
    • 1
  • Ian Gray
    • 1
  • Jo Peters
    • 2
  • Patrick M. Nolan
    • 2
  • A. Jacqueline Hunter
    • 1
  1. 1.GlaxoSmithKlineUK
  2. 2.MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit and Mouse Genome CentreUK
  3. 3.MRC Institute of Hearing ResearchUK
  4. 4.Institut PasteurFrance
  5. 5.Department of Human Anatomy and GeneticsUniversity of OxfordUK
  6. 6.Neurogenetics DepartmentImperial CollegeUK
  7. 7.Department of Morbid AnatomyQueen Mary and Westfield CollegeUK
  8. 8.Institut PasteurFrance