Fish Physiology and Biochemistry

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 683–693

Sperm quality in male Barbus barbus L. fed different diets during the spawning season

Authors

    • Research Institute of Fish Culture and HydrobiologyUniversity of South Bohemia
  • Martin Pšenička
    • Research Institute of Fish Culture and HydrobiologyUniversity of South Bohemia
  • Tomáš Policar
    • Research Institute of Fish Culture and HydrobiologyUniversity of South Bohemia
  • Marek Rodina
    • Research Institute of Fish Culture and HydrobiologyUniversity of South Bohemia
  • Jitka Hamáčková
    • Research Institute of Fish Culture and HydrobiologyUniversity of South Bohemia
  • Pavel Kozák
    • Research Institute of Fish Culture and HydrobiologyUniversity of South Bohemia
  • Otomar Linhart
    • Research Institute of Fish Culture and HydrobiologyUniversity of South Bohemia
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10695-009-9325-7

Cite this article as:
Alavi, S.M.H., Pšenička, M., Policar, T. et al. Fish Physiol Biochem (2009) 35: 683. doi:10.1007/s10695-009-9325-7

Abstract

Sperm quality of Barbus barbus L. was compared among the three following dietary regimes: Group A, fed 100% commercial diet (Karpico™ containing 33% crude protein and 6% fat), Group B, fed 78% commercial diet and 22% frozen chironomid (Chironomus plumosus) larvae, and Group C, fed 56% commercial diet and 44% frozen chironomid larvae. Concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in Group A, B, and C were 39.1, 42.0, and 44.6, respectively, as a percentage of total fatty acids. Sperm morphology, volume, concentration and motility, total number of spermatozoa, and osmolality of the seminal plasma were compared during the spawning season. Dietary regime did not influence sperm volume, concentration, or total number of spermatozoa, osmolality of seminal plasma, or the percentage of motile sperm, but significantly affected sperm morphology (except for anterior and posterior parts of the midpiece) and sperm velocity (P < 0.05). Groups B and C showed similar sperm characteristics during the spawning season compared to Group A. Almost all parameters changed either among or within groups during the spawning season, suggesting differences in terms of the optimal time for sperm collection. The best time for sperm collection was March for Group A, but April for Groups B and C, when the osmolality of the seminal plasma measured 289 mOsmol kg−1 and sperm motility was maximal. Spermatogenesis, hydration, and cell decomposition were confirmed as the three major parameters controlling sperm characteristics during the spawning season. The possible correlation between sperm morphology and motility requires further study.

Keywords

OsmolalitySperm motilitySpermatozoa velocitySpermatozoa concentrationSperm volumeSperm morphologyTotal number of spermatozoa

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009