Fire Technology

, 46:91

Numerical Modelling of Thin-Walled Stainless Steel Structural Elements in Case of Fire

Authors

    • Department of Civil EngineeringLABEST - University of Aveiro
  • Paulo Vila Real
    • Department of Civil EngineeringLABEST - University of Aveiro
  • Luís Simões da Silva
    • Department of Civil EngineeringISISE - University of Coimbra
  • Jean-Marc Franssen
    • Structural EngineeringUniversity of Liege
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10694-009-0084-x

Cite this article as:
Lopes, N., Vila Real, P., Simões da Silva, L. et al. Fire Technol (2010) 46: 91. doi:10.1007/s10694-009-0084-x

Abstract

In this paper, the structural response of stainless steel thin-walled elements submitted to fire is analysed numerically by means of the geometrically and materially non-linear Finite Element program SAFIR, including imperfections. In order to make these simulations, two main changes in the program were made: (i) the code was changed in order to deal with the stainless steel 2D material constitutive law to be used with shell elements and (ii) the possibility of the program to take into account residual stresses with shell finite elements was introduced. The stainless steel stress–strain relationship at high temperatures was based on the one presented in part 1.2 of Eurocode 3. To model the strain hardening exhibited by the stainless steels, using the shell element formulation, an approximation to the Eurocode 3 constitutive law was needed. Local and global geometrical imperfections were considered in the simulations. The paper shows the influence of the residual stresses on the ultimate load-carrying capacity of thin-walled stainless steel structural elements in case of fire.

Keywords

stainless steelfirethin-wallednumerical modellinglocal buckling

Nomenclature

a, b, c, d

Parameters to calculate the stainless steel stress–strain relationship: and also parameters to calculate the approximation proposed in this paper to the stainless steel hardening rule

e

Parameter to calculate the stainless steel stress–strain relationship

fu,θ

Tensile strength

f0.2p,θ

The proof strength at 0.2% plastic strain

k

Plastic strain

Ea,θ

Slope of the linear elastic range

Ea,θ

Slope of the linear elastic range

Ect,θ

Slope at proof strength

εc,θ

Total strain at proof strength

εu,θ

Ultimate strain

σ1, σ2

Principal stresses

σc,res

Comparison stress of the residual stresses

τ

Stress from the hardening rule

{σres}

Matrix of residual stresses in the axis i (x, y and xy)

res}

Matrix of residual strains in the axis i (x, y and xy)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009