Familial Cancer

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 287–292

Family history and colorectal cancer survival in women

  • Anne C. Kirchhoff
  • Polly A. Newcomb
  • Amy Trentham-Dietz
  • Hazel B. Nichols
  • John M. Hampton
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10689-008-9190-z

Cite this article as:
Kirchhoff, A.C., Newcomb, P.A., Trentham-Dietz, A. et al. Familial Cancer (2008) 7: 287. doi:10.1007/s10689-008-9190-z

Abstract

Purpose Family history of colorectal cancer may be a phenotype for numerous genetic mutations which increase colorectal cancer risk and may affect survival after diagnosis. We examined the relationship between self-reported first-degree family history of colorectal cancer and survival. Methods We identified female Wisconsin residents ages 20–74 with a new diagnosis of invasive colorectal cancer from two population-based case–control studies; 1,469 women were interviewed. Follow-up averaged 7.9 years. We performed multivariable Cox proportional hazards regressions to calculate adjusted hazard rate ratios [HR] and corresponding 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] for risk of death by family history. Results Of 1,391 cases with available first-degree family history, 481 were deceased, 268 due to colorectal cancer. In multivariable analyses, cases with any family history (N = 262) had a statistically non-significant lower risk of death (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.62, 1.20) compared to no family history (N = 1,129). Cases with two or more affected family members (N = 46) showed significantly lower risk of death when compared to women with no family history (HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13, 0.92). Conclusions Although individuals with a colorectal cancer family history are diagnosed with the disease more often than the general population, these data suggest that survival from colorectal cancer may not be worse.

Keywords

Colorectal cancerColon cancerRectal cancerFamily historyWomenSurvival

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne C. Kirchhoff
    • 1
    • 2
  • Polly A. Newcomb
    • 2
  • Amy Trentham-Dietz
    • 3
  • Hazel B. Nichols
    • 3
  • John M. Hampton
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Health ServicesUniversity of Washington, School of Public Health and Community MedicineSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WashingtonSeattleUSA
  3. 3.University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WisconsinMadisonUSA