Familial Cancer

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 239–244

Frequency of Familial Colon Cancer and Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch Syndrome) in a Large Population Database

  • Richard A. Kerber
  • Deborah W. Neklason
  • Wade S. Samowitz
  • Randall W. Burt
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10689-005-0657-x

Cite this article as:
Kerber, R.A., Neklason, D.W., Samowitz, W.S. et al. Familial Cancer (2005) 4: 239. doi:10.1007/s10689-005-0657-x

Abstract

Background and aims: Estimates have been made concerning the fraction of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases that meet Amsterdam I criteria but not Amsterdam II criteria. The aim of this study was to determine in a population setting what fraction of CRC cases can be considered familial high-risk, what fraction of these meet Amsterdam I or II criteria, and what fraction of CRC cases overall meet Amsterdam I and II criteria. Methods: The Utah Population Data Base (UPDB), which links Utah genealogies to the Utah Cancer Registry, was used to examine the aims of the study. Familial high-risk was operationally defined as CRC occurring at an age <50 years or as a part of a first-degree relative pair. A subset of Amsterdam positive cancers was tested for microsatellite instability (MSI) to determine what fraction of Amsterdam families was likely to have hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Results: Of the 6,628 CRC cases in the UPDB, 24.5% met the criteria for familial high-risk. Of these, 2.6% met Amsterdam I criteria and 5.5% Amsterdam II. Of total data base CRC cases, 0.8% met Amsterdam I criteria and 2.3% Amsterdam II. In a subset of colon tumors from Amsterdam families, 70% were MSI stable. Conclusions: Although nearly 25% of CRC cases in our population data base met a simple definition of familial high-risk, only a small fraction of these and a smaller fraction of total CRC cases met Amsterdam I or II criteria. Less than half of a limited set of tumors from Amsterdam families were MSI positive.

Key words

Amsterdam criteriafamilial colon cancerhereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancerHNPCCLynch syndrome

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Kerber
    • 1
  • Deborah W. Neklason
    • 1
  • Wade S. Samowitz
    • 2
  • Randall W. Burt
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Oncological SciencesUniversity of Utah, School of MedicineUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyUniversity of Utah, School of MedicineUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineUniversity of Utah, School of MedicineUSA
  4. 4.Huntsman Cancer InstituteUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA