Experimental Astronomy

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 151–273

Science with ASKAP

The Australian square-kilometre-array pathfinder
  • S. Johnston
  • R. Taylor
  • M. Bailes
  • N. Bartel
  • C. Baugh
  • M. Bietenholz
  • C. Blake
  • R. Braun
  • J. Brown
  • S. Chatterjee
  • J. Darling
  • A. Deller
  • R. Dodson
  • P. Edwards
  • R. Ekers
  • S. Ellingsen
  • I. Feain
  • B. Gaensler
  • M. Haverkorn
  • G. Hobbs
  • A. Hopkins
  • C. Jackson
  • C. James
  • G. Joncas
  • V. Kaspi
  • V. Kilborn
  • B. Koribalski
  • R. Kothes
  • T. Landecker
  • A. Lenc
  • J. Lovell
  • J.-P. Macquart
  • R. Manchester
  • D. Matthews
  • N. McClure-Griffiths
  • R. Norris
  • U.-L. Pen
  • C. Phillips
  • C. Power
  • R. Protheroe
  • E. Sadler
  • B. Schmidt
  • I. Stairs
  • L. Staveley-Smith
  • J. Stil
  • S. Tingay
  • A. Tzioumis
  • M. Walker
  • J. Wall
  • M. Wolleben
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10686-008-9124-7

Cite this article as:
Johnston, S., Taylor, R., Bailes, M. et al. Exp Astron (2008) 22: 151. doi:10.1007/s10686-008-9124-7

Abstract

The future of cm and m-wave astronomy lies with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a telescope under development by a consortium of 17 countries. The SKA will be 50 times more sensitive than any existing radio facility. A majority of the key science for the SKA will be addressed through large-area imaging of the Universe at frequencies from 300 MHz to a few GHz. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is aimed squarely in this frequency range, and achieves instantaneous wide-area imaging through the development and deployment of phase-array feed systems on parabolic reflectors. This large field-of-view makes ASKAP an unprecedented synoptic telescope poised to achieve substantial advances in SKA key science. The central core of ASKAP will be located at the Murchison Radio Observatory in inland Western Australia, one of the most radio-quiet locations on the Earth and one of the sites selected by the international community as a potential location for the SKA. Following an introductory description of ASKAP, this document contains 7 chapters describing specific science programmes for ASKAP. In summary, the goals of these programmes are as follows:
  • The detection of a million galaxies in atomic hydrogen emission across 75% of the sky out to a redshift of 0.2 to understand galaxy formation and gas evolution in the nearby Universe.

  • The detection of synchrotron radiation from 60 million galaxies to determine the evolution, formation and population of galaxies across cosmic time and enabling key cosmological tests.

  • The detection of polarized radiation from over 500,000 galaxies, allowing a grid of rotation measures at 10′ to explore the evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies over cosmic time.

  • The understanding of the evolution of the interstellar medium of our own Galaxy and the processes that drive its chemical and physical evolution.

  • The high-resolution imaging of intense, energetic phenomena by enlarging the Australian and global Very Long Baseline networks.

  • The discovery and timing of a thousand new radio pulsars.

  • The characterization of the radio transient sky through detection and monitoring of transient sources such as gamma ray bursts, radio supernovae and intra-day variables.

The combination of location, technological innovation and scientific program will ensure that ASKAP will be a world-leading radio astronomy facility, closely aligned with the scientific and technical direction of the SKA. A brief summary chapter emphasizes the point, and considers discovery space.

Keywords

Radio astronomy techniquesRadio telescopesSquare kilometre arrayVery long baseline interferometryExtragalactic HIRadio continuum surveysCosmological evolutionGalaxy formationStar formationRotation measureExtragalactic radio source polarizationGalactic structureGalactic magnetic fieldMagellenic cloudsPulsarsRadio transient sourcesGamma-ray burstersIntra-day variability

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Johnston
    • 1
  • R. Taylor
    • 2
  • M. Bailes
    • 3
  • N. Bartel
    • 4
  • C. Baugh
    • 5
  • M. Bietenholz
    • 4
    • 6
  • C. Blake
    • 3
  • R. Braun
    • 1
  • J. Brown
    • 2
  • S. Chatterjee
    • 7
  • J. Darling
    • 8
  • A. Deller
    • 3
  • R. Dodson
    • 9
  • P. Edwards
    • 1
  • R. Ekers
    • 1
  • S. Ellingsen
    • 10
  • I. Feain
    • 1
  • B. Gaensler
    • 7
  • M. Haverkorn
    • 11
  • G. Hobbs
    • 1
  • A. Hopkins
    • 7
  • C. Jackson
    • 1
  • C. James
    • 12
  • G. Joncas
    • 13
  • V. Kaspi
    • 14
  • V. Kilborn
    • 3
  • B. Koribalski
    • 1
  • R. Kothes
    • 2
  • T. Landecker
    • 15
  • A. Lenc
    • 3
  • J. Lovell
    • 10
  • J.-P. Macquart
    • 16
  • R. Manchester
    • 1
  • D. Matthews
    • 17
  • N. McClure-Griffiths
    • 1
  • R. Norris
    • 1
  • U.-L. Pen
    • 18
  • C. Phillips
    • 1
  • C. Power
    • 3
  • R. Protheroe
    • 12
  • E. Sadler
    • 7
  • B. Schmidt
    • 19
  • I. Stairs
    • 20
  • L. Staveley-Smith
    • 21
  • J. Stil
    • 2
  • S. Tingay
    • 22
  • A. Tzioumis
    • 1
  • M. Walker
    • 23
  • J. Wall
    • 20
  • M. Wolleben
    • 15
  1. 1.Australia Telescope National FacilityCommonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research OrganisationEppingAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  3. 3.Centre for Astrophysics and SupercomputingSwinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia
  4. 4.Department of Physics and AstronomyYork UniversityTorontoCanada
  5. 5.Institute for Computational CosmologyUniversity of DurhamDurhamUK
  6. 6.Hartebeesthoek Radio ObservatoryKrugersdorpSouth Africa
  7. 7.School of PhysicsThe University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  8. 8.Center for Astrophysics and Space AstronomyUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  9. 9.Observatorio Astronomico NacionalAlcara de HenaresSpain
  10. 10.School of Mathematics and PhysicsUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia
  11. 11.Astronomy DepartmentUniversity of California-BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  12. 12.School of Chemistry & PhysicsUniversity of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  13. 13.Department de Physique et Observatoire du Mont MeganticUniversite LavalQuebec CityCanada
  14. 14.Department of PhysicsMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  15. 15.Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of AstrophysicsNational Research CouncilPentictonCanada
  16. 16.Astronomy DepartmentCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA
  17. 17.Department of PhysicsLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  18. 18.Canadian Institute for Theoretical AstrophysicsUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  19. 19.Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring ObservatoryCanberraAustralia
  20. 20.Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  21. 21.School of PhysicsUniversity of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia
  22. 22.Department of Imaging and Applied PhysicsCurtin University of TechnologyBentleyAustralia
  23. 23.Manly Astrophysics Workshop Pty LtdManlyAustralia