Euphytica

, Volume 151, Issue 3, pp 371–382

Response of lentil (Lens culinaris) germplasm to high concentrations of soil boron

  • Kristy Hobson
  • Roger Armstrong
  • Marc Nicolas
  • David Connor
  • Michael Materne
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10681-006-9159-7

Cite this article as:
Hobson, K., Armstrong, R., Nicolas, M. et al. Euphytica (2006) 151: 371. doi:10.1007/s10681-006-9159-7

Abstract

For lentil production to expand further in Australia, adaptation to the less favourable soils of the low to medium rainfall zones is required. To improve adaptation to these regions, varieties are required with increased tolerance to soil constraints such as high concentrations of boron (B), salinity and sodicity. To evaluate the range of B tolerance in lentil germplasm, 310 lines were screened in soil with a high concentration of B and tolerance was assessed at the seedling stage. A wide range in response to high concentrations of soil B was observed in the germplasm tested. Current Australian varieties were generally very intolerant to high concentrations of soil B. High levels of B tolerance was identified in germplasm originating from Afghanistan and Ethiopia. A subsequent experiment comparing lentils with different levels of B tolerance found that tolerant accessions (ILL213A and ILL2024) produced greater above and below ground biomass than intolerant accessions. The tolerant accessions had no significant yield loss under a high B treatment (extractable B = 18.20 mg/kg) compared to the control treatment (extractable B = 1.55 mg/kg). The large improvement in B tolerance, at soil concentrations typical of those found in the target regions, suggests there is potential to improve the tolerance level of adapted varieties and expand lentil production areas to regions with higher concentrations of soil B.

Keywords

Boron toxicity Tolerance Origin 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristy Hobson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Roger Armstrong
    • 1
  • Marc Nicolas
    • 2
  • David Connor
    • 2
  • Michael Materne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Primary IndustriesHorshamAustralia
  2. 2.School of Agriculture and Food SystemsUniversity of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia

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