Slavery, Carbon, and Moral Progress

Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10677-016-9746-1

Cite this article as:
Jamieson, D. Ethic Theory Moral Prac (2016). doi:10.1007/s10677-016-9746-1
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Abstract

My goal in this paper is to shed light on how moral progress actually occurs. I begin by restating a conception of moral progress that I set out in previous work, the “Naïve Conception,” and explain how it comports with various normative and metaethical views. I go on to develop an index of moral progress and show how judgments about moral progress can be made. I then discuss an example of moral progress from the past—the British abolition of the Atlantic slave trade—with a view to what can be learned from this for a contemporary struggle for moral progress: the movement to decarbonize the global economy. I close with some thoughts about how moral progress actually occurs.

Keywords

Moral progressSlaveryClimate changeEvolutionary ethicsMoral realism

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Environmental StudiesNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA