Ethical Theory and Moral Practice

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 449–463

Vagueness, Incomparability, and the Collapsing Principle


DOI: 10.1007/s10677-012-9352-9

Cite this article as:
Carlson, E. Ethic Theory Moral Prac (2013) 16: 449. doi:10.1007/s10677-012-9352-9


John Broome has argued that incomparability and vagueness cannot coexist in a given betterness order. His argument essentially hinges on an assumption he calls the ‘collapsing principle’. In an earlier article I criticized this principle, but Broome has recently expressed doubts about the cogency of my criticism. Moreover, Cristian Constantinescu has defended Broome’s view from my objection. In this paper, I present further arguments against the collapsing principle, and try to show that Constantinescu’s defence of Broome’s position fails.


Value comparisons“Better than”VaguenessIncomparabilityJohn BroomeCristian Constantinescu

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden