European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 133, Issue 4, pp 841–855

Phytophthora bilorbang sp. nov., a new species associated with the decline of Rubus anglocandicans (European blackberry) in Western Australia

Authors

  • Sonia Aghighi
    • Centre for Phytophthora Science and Management, School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Murdoch University
  • Giles E. St. J. Hardy
    • Centre for Phytophthora Science and Management, School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Murdoch University
  • John K. Scott
    • CSIRO Ecosystem Science and Climate Change Adaptation Flagship
    • Centre for Phytophthora Science and Management, School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Murdoch University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10658-012-0006-5

Cite this article as:
Aghighi, S., Hardy, G.E.S.J., Scott, J.K. et al. Eur J Plant Pathol (2012) 133: 841. doi:10.1007/s10658-012-0006-5

Abstract

A new homothallic Phytophthora species, isolated from rhizosphere soil and roots of declining or dead Rubus anglocandicans (European blackberry) in south-west Western Australia, is described as Phytophthora bilorbang sp. nov. It produces non-papillate sporangia, smooth-walled oogonia containing thick-walled oospores, and paragynous antheridia. Although morphologically similar to several species within ITS Clade 6 and sub-clade II, namely P. gibbosa, P. gregata and P. megasperma, phylogenetic analyses of the ITS, cox1, HSP90, BT and NADH gene regions demonstrate that P. bilorbang sp. nov. is a distinct species. Additionally, P. bilorbang differs from these species in its growth and colony morphology on several media. Pathogenicity tests indicate that P. bilorbang could be responsible for the decline syndrome of blackberry within the Warren and Donnelly River catchments in the south-west of Western Australia.

Keywords

Biological controlWeed declineRubus speciesSoil pathogenMultigene phylogenyRiparian ecosystem

Supplementary material

10658_2012_6_MOESM1_ESM.docx (107 kb)
Table S1Morphological characters, dimensions and temperature-growth relations of Phytophthora bilorbang, P. gibbosa, P. gregata and P. megasperma. Characters decisive for species discrimination are highlighted in bold. (DOCX 106 kb)

Copyright information

© KNPV 2012