European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 128, Issue 1, pp 101–111

Fusarium species and mycotoxin profiles on commercial maize hybrids in Germany

Authors

    • Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation
  • Sebastian Zuehlke
    • Institute of Environmental ResearchDortmund University of Technology
  • Michael Spiteller
    • Institute of Environmental ResearchDortmund University of Technology
  • Ulrike Steiner
    • Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation
  • Heinz W. Dehne
    • Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation
  • Cees Waalwijk
    • Plant Research International BVBiointeractions and Plant Health
  • Ineke de Vries
    • Plant Research International BVBiointeractions and Plant Health
  • Erich C. Oerke
    • Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10658-010-9634-9

Cite this article as:
Goertz, A., Zuehlke, S., Spiteller, M. et al. Eur J Plant Pathol (2010) 128: 101. doi:10.1007/s10658-010-9634-9

Abstract

High year-to-year variability in the incidence of Fusarium spp. and mycotoxin contamination was observed in a two-year survey investigating the impact of maize ear rot in 84 field samples from Germany. Fusarium verticillioides, F. graminearum, and F. proliferatum were the predominant species infecting maize kernels in 2006, whereas in 2007 the most frequently isolated species were F. graminearum, F. cerealis and F. subglutinans. Fourteen Fusarium-related mycotoxins were detected as contaminants of maize kernels analyzed by a multi-mycotoxin determination method. In 2006, a growth season characterized by high temperature and low rainfall during anthesis and early grain filling, 75% of the maize samples were contaminated with deoxynivalenol, 34% with fumonisins and 27% with zearalenone. In 2007, characterized by moderate temperatures and frequent rainfall during the entire growth season, none of the 40 maize samples had quantifiable levels of fumonisins while deoxynivalenol and zearalenone were detected in 90% and 93% of the fields, respectively. In addition, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxnivalenol, moniliformin, beauvericin, nivalenol and enniatin B were detected as common contaminants produced in both growing seasons. The results demonstrate a significant mycotoxin contamination associated with maize ear rots in Germany and indicate, with regard to anticipated climate change, that fumonisins-producing species already present in German maize production may become more important.

Keywords

DeoxynivalenolEar rotF. verticillioidesF. graminearumFumonisinZearalenone

Abbreviations

Tef

translation elongation factor 1-alpha gene

DON

deoxynivalenol

FBs

fumonisins

ZEA

zearalenone

Copyright information

© KNPV 2010