European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 127, Issue 1, pp 99–112

Evaluation of non-chemical seed treatment methods for the control of Alternaria dauci and A. radicina on carrot seeds

  • Eckhard Koch
  • Annegret Schmitt
  • Dietrich Stephan
  • Carola Kromphardt
  • Marga Jahn
  • Hermann-Josef Krauthausen
  • Gustaf Forsberg
  • Sigrid Werner
  • Tahsein Amein
  • Sandra A. I. Wright
  • Federico Tinivella
  • Maria L. Gullino
  • Steven J. Roberts
  • Jan van der Wolf
  • Steven P. C. Groot
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10658-009-9575-3

Cite this article as:
Koch, E., Schmitt, A., Stephan, D. et al. Eur J Plant Pathol (2010) 127: 99. doi:10.1007/s10658-009-9575-3

Abstract

The current study was initiated to evaluate the efficacy of physical methods (hot water, aerated steam, electron treatment) and agents of natural origin (resistance inducers, plant derived products, micro-organisms) as seed treatments of carrots for control of Alternaria dauci and A. radicina. Control of both Alternaria species by seed treatment with the resistance inducers was generally poor. Results were also not satisfactory with most of the formulated commercial micro-organism preparations. Based on the average of five field trials, one of these, BA 2552 (Pseudomonas chlororaphis), provided a low but significant increase in plant stand. Among the experimental micro-organisms, the best results were obtained with Pseudomonas sp. strain MF 416 and Clonostachys rosea strain IK726. A similar level of efficacy was provided by seed treatment with an emulsion (1%) of thyme oil in water. Good and consistent control was generally achieved with the physical methods aerated steam, hot water and electron treatment. Aerated steam treatment was, apart from the thiram-containing chemical standard, the best single treatment, and its performance may at least partially be due to extensive pre-testing, resulting in dosages optimally adapted to the respective seed lot. In some of the experiments the effect of the hot water treatment, which was tested at a fixed, not specifically adapted dosage, was significantly improved when combined with a Pseudomonas sp. MF 416 or C. rosea IK726 treatment. The results are discussed in relation to the outcome of experiments in which the same seed treatment methods and agents were tested in other seed-borne vegetable pathosystems.

Keywords

Organic farming Biocontrol agents Physical seed treatment methods Resistance inducers Essential oils 

Copyright information

© KNPV 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eckhard Koch
    • 1
  • Annegret Schmitt
    • 1
  • Dietrich Stephan
    • 1
  • Carola Kromphardt
    • 2
  • Marga Jahn
    • 2
  • Hermann-Josef Krauthausen
    • 3
  • Gustaf Forsberg
    • 4
  • Sigrid Werner
    • 5
  • Tahsein Amein
    • 6
  • Sandra A. I. Wright
    • 7
    • 8
  • Federico Tinivella
    • 9
  • Maria L. Gullino
    • 9
  • Steven J. Roberts
    • 10
  • Jan van der Wolf
    • 11
  • Steven P. C. Groot
    • 11
  1. 1.JKI, Institute for Biological ControlDarmstadtGermany
  2. 2.JKI, Institute for Strategies and Technology Assessment in Plant ProtectionKleinmachnowGermany
  3. 3.Agricultural Service CentreNeustadtGermany
  4. 4.Seedgard ABUppsalaSweden
  5. 5.Hild Samen GmbHMarbach am NeckarGermany
  6. 6.Department of Cellular and Molecular BiologyGöteborgSweden
  7. 7.Department of Plant and Environmental SciencesGöteborgSweden
  8. 8.Dipartimento di Scienze Animali, Vegetali e dell’Ambiente, Facoltà di AgrariaUniversity of MoliseCampobassoItaly
  9. 9.Centre of Competence for the Innovation in the Agro-Environmental Sector (AGROINNOVA)University of TorinoGrugliascoItaly
  10. 10.Plant Health SolutionsWarwickUK
  11. 11.Plant Research InternationalWageningenThe Netherlands

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