European Journal of Epidemiology

, Volume 29, Issue 9, pp 629–638

Association of adiponectin and leptin with relative telomere length in seven independent cohorts including 11,448 participants

  • Linda Broer
  • Julia Raschenberger
  • Joris Deelen
  • Massimo Mangino
  • Veryan Codd
  • Kirsi H. Pietiläinen
  • Eva Albrecht
  • Najaf Amin
  • Marian Beekman
  • Anton J. M. de Craen
  • Christian Gieger
  • Margot Haun
  • Peter Henneman
  • Christian Herder
  • Iiris Hovatta
  • Annika Laser
  • Lyudmyla Kedenko
  • Wolfgang Koenig
  • Barbara Kollerits
  • Eeva Moilanen
  • Ben A. Oostra
  • Bernhard Paulweber
  • Lydia Quaye
  • Aila Rissanen
  • Michael Roden
  • Ida Surakka
  • Ana M. Valdes
  • Katriina Vuolteenaho
  • Barbara Thorand
  • Ko Willems van Dijk
  • Jaakko Kaprio
  • Tim D. Spector
  • P. Eline Slagboom
  • Nilesh J. Samani
  • Florian Kronenberg
  • Cornelia M. van Duijn
  • Karl-Heinz Ladwig
GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGY

DOI: 10.1007/s10654-014-9940-1

Cite this article as:
Broer, L., Raschenberger, J., Deelen, J. et al. Eur J Epidemiol (2014) 29: 629. doi:10.1007/s10654-014-9940-1

Abstract

Oxidative stress and inflammation are major contributors to accelerated age-related relative telomere length (RTL) shortening. Both conditions are strongly linked to leptin and adiponectin, the most prominent adipocyte-derived protein hormones. As high leptin levels and low levels of adiponectin have been implicated in inflammation, one expects adiponectin to be positively associated with RTL while leptin should be negatively associated. Within the ENGAGE consortium, we investigated the association of RTL with adiponectin and leptin in seven independent cohorts with a total of 11,448 participants. We performed partial correlation analysis on Z-transformed RTL and LN-transformed leptin/adiponectin, adjusting for age and sex. In extended models we adjusted for body mass index (BMI) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Adiponectin showed a borderline significant association with RTL. This appeared to be determined by a single study and when the outlier study was removed, this association disappeared. The association between RTL and leptin was highly significant (r = −0.05; p = 1.81 × 10−7). Additional adjustment for BMI or CRP did not change the results. Sex-stratified analysis revealed no difference between men and women. Our study suggests that high leptin levels are associated with short RTL.

Keywords

Telomere length Adipocytokines Leptin Oxidative stress Inflammation 

Supplementary material

10654_2014_9940_MOESM1_ESM.doc (391 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 391 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Broer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julia Raschenberger
    • 3
  • Joris Deelen
    • 2
    • 4
  • Massimo Mangino
    • 5
  • Veryan Codd
    • 6
  • Kirsi H. Pietiläinen
    • 7
    • 8
  • Eva Albrecht
    • 9
  • Najaf Amin
    • 1
  • Marian Beekman
    • 2
    • 4
  • Anton J. M. de Craen
    • 10
  • Christian Gieger
    • 9
    • 25
    • 22
  • Margot Haun
    • 3
  • Peter Henneman
    • 11
  • Christian Herder
    • 12
  • Iiris Hovatta
    • 13
    • 14
    • 15
  • Annika Laser
    • 9
    • 25
    • 22
  • Lyudmyla Kedenko
    • 16
  • Wolfgang Koenig
    • 17
  • Barbara Kollerits
    • 3
  • Eeva Moilanen
    • 18
  • Ben A. Oostra
    • 1
  • Bernhard Paulweber
    • 16
  • Lydia Quaye
    • 5
  • Aila Rissanen
    • 19
  • Michael Roden
    • 12
    • 20
  • Ida Surakka
    • 8
    • 21
  • Ana M. Valdes
    • 5
  • Katriina Vuolteenaho
    • 18
  • Barbara Thorand
    • 22
  • Ko Willems van Dijk
    • 11
    • 23
  • Jaakko Kaprio
    • 8
    • 15
    • 24
  • Tim D. Spector
    • 5
  • P. Eline Slagboom
    • 2
    • 4
  • Nilesh J. Samani
    • 6
  • Florian Kronenberg
    • 3
  • Cornelia M. van Duijn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Karl-Heinz Ladwig
    • 22
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyErasmus University Medical CenterRotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Netherlands Consortium for Healthy AgingLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Division of Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Medical Genetics, Molecular and Clinical PharmacologyInnsbruck Medical UniversityInnsbruckAustria
  4. 4.Section of Molecular EpidemiologyLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Department of Twin Research and Genetic EpidemiologyKing’s College LondonLondonUK
  6. 6.Department of Cardiovascular SciencesUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK
  7. 7.Obesity Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Research Programs Unit, Diabetes and ObesityHelsinki UniversityHelsinkiFinland
  8. 8.Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, FIMMUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  9. 9.Institute of Genetic EpidemiologyHelmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental HealthNeuherbergGermany
  10. 10.Department of Gerontology and GeriatricsLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  11. 11.Department Human GeneticsLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  12. 12.Institute for Clinical Diabetology, German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes ResearchHeinrich Heine University DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany
  13. 13.Research Programs Unit, Molecular Neurology, Biomedicum-HelsinkiUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  14. 14.Department of Medical Genetics, Haartman InstituteUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  15. 15.Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse ServicesNational Institute for Health and WelfareHelsinkiFinland
  16. 16.First Department of Internal MedicineParacelsus Medical University/Salzburger LandesklinikenSalzburgAustria
  17. 17.Department of Internal Medicine II-CardiologyUniversity of Ulm Medical CenterUlmGermany
  18. 18.The Immunopharmacology Research GroupUniversity of Tampere School of Medicine and Tampere University HospitalTampereFinland
  19. 19.Obesity Research Unit, Department of PsychiatryHelsinki University Central HospitalHelsinkiFinland
  20. 20.Department of Metabolic DiseasesUniversity Hospital DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany
  21. 21.Public Health Genomics Unit, Department of Chronic Disease PreventionNational Institute for Health and WelfareHelsinkiFinland
  22. 22.Institute of Epidemiology IIHelmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental HealthNeuherbergGermany
  23. 23.Department of EndocrinologyLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  24. 24.Department of Public Health, Hjelt InstituteUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  25. 25.Research Unit of Molecular EpidemiologyHelmholtz Center Munich – German Research Center for Environmental HealthNeuherbergGermany

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